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Marcus Off Duty: The Recipes I Cook at Home

By Marcus Samuelsson | September 9, 2014

Marcus Off Duty: The Recipes I Cook at Home
Off  Duty Cover

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Since publishing my last cookbook, New American Table, so much has happened. I have cooked for the President of the United States at his first State Dinner, I have opened my dream restaurant, Red Rooster Harlem, I have written my memoir Yes,Chef and joined the group of mentors on ABC’s The Taste. Read More

Community

Marcus’s Meatless Monday Menu Takes the UN

By Erica Singer | October 7, 2014

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Marcus Samuelsson is at it again.

Chef-owner of Red Rooster Harlem, as well as an avid Meatless Monday and UN supporter, Marcus designed the menu for the most recent United Nations Development Program (UNDP) reception.

As members gathered for the UN Secretary-General’s Climate Summit, it only seemed fitting that his Meatless Monday menu similarly fit the green goals that evening.

Besides for the opportunity to indulge UN participants with delicious vegetarian cuisine, like with his signature Pear Pumpkin Salad with Pumpkin Seed Recipe, Marcus was also excited to promote Meatless Mondays.

And honestly, why wouldn’t he be? Here are just some of the benefits:

  • Studies show that plant-based diets are associated with a variety of health benefits.
  • Researchers have also discovered that a Monday start-date helps individuals carry their healthy intentions for the week.
  • Finally, advocates argue that it’s also simple way of shrinking one’s carbon footprint.

In this case, Meatless Mondays are more than just a weekly refuge for conflicted omnivores.

On the contrary, they encourage us to take a step back, think about the food we put into our individual bodies, and hopefully better our shared physical environment.

With slogans surrounding the UN summit stating, “Meatless Monday Menu: Lower Your Carbon Footprint,” it was clear that Marcus perfectly catered to his meat-free international audience that night.

Chowing down on Marcus’s seasonal pumpkin salad, it was the perfect day for thinking about how our food consumption truly holds greater collective potential.

ContestCookbooks

Marcus Off Duty Pre-Order Giveaway!!

By Marcus Samuelsson | September 29, 2014

Marcus in Harlem

I’m so excited for Marcus Off Duty: The Recipes I Cook at Home, that I’m offering a special promotion with the book’s publisher, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH).

For pre-orders of MARCUS OFF DUTY, HMH will send you a bookplate signed by me that can be inserted in your book.

When you pre-order MARCUS OFF DUTY from an online retailer or in-person bookstore, send a copy of your receipt to hmhcooks@gmail.com (a photo of the receipt is acceptable.)

Be sure to include your mailing address. US participants only.

Signed bookplates are available while supply lasts, so be sure to enter ASAP!

Recipe Roundup

My Favorite Mash-Ups

By Marcus Samuelsson | August 19, 2014

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I love twists on classic cuisine. My style of cooking blends culture, contrasts flavors, and plays with new styles of eating. It’s always been my methodology. That’s why I’m so excited for the second episode of my new show, The Feed. The episode, “Mashed Up Dishes & Food Design Wishes,” has Max Silvestri, Gail Simmons, and me crafting daring new food combinations. In preparation for the airing of the episode, I’ve compiled a few of my best food mash-up recipes below. Give them a try for something different, and make sure to tune into The Feed on Thursday, August 21, at 10 PM Eastern Time.

Korean Wonton Tacos with Napa Slaw

Swede Doggy Dog with Shrimp Salad 

Chai Toddy

Corn Pancakes with Chili-Covered Gravlax

News

The Feed Premieres this Thursday, August 21st at 10PM EST on FYI Network

By Marcus Samuelsson | August 18, 2014

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I am so excited to announce that my new show, The Feed will begin airing on Thursday, August 21st with back-to-back episodes at 10PM EST on FYI. Together with Top Chef‘s Gail Simmons and comedian Max Silvestri, I’ll be navigating NYC’s latest food trends in this one of a kind culinary adventure. Part talk show, part challenge,The Feed aims to open up viewers to unique culinary experiences and try something different.

In episode 1, “Ghostly Meals & Food with Wheels,” we attempt to solve the mystery of phantom cuisine and shake up the norms of food to go. Episode 2, “Mashed Up Dishes & Food Design Wishes,” has Max, Gail, and I designing daring new food combinations and gadgets.

Tune in this Thursday, August 21 at 10 pm Eastern Time to check out the series premiere of The Feed. Click here for more information and airdates, and enjoy the preview clip below!

Food Stories

Swedish Salty Licorice

By Suzannah Schneider | August 15, 2014

Image by /kallu

It’s unfathomable to most, coveted by some. Enthusiasts keep an emergency stash of the stuff in their purse; others take a nibble and promptly spit it out. It elicits passion, nostalgia, pain, discomfort, and satisfaction.

Ah, yes, Swedish salty licorice.

Swedish candy is notoriously fantastic, but salted licorice is the black sheep of the otherwise delectable family of gummy sweets. The stuff is potent and undoubtedly polarizing.

Licorice itself is the root of a plant called Glycyrrhiza glabra that is native to Spain, Italy, and Asia. The plant contains a component that is 20-40 times sweeter than sugar, so it is logical flavoring option for candy.

No one quite knows how or why licorice candy was first combined with a salty flavor, but its history as a confectionary began in Scandinavia in the 1930s. Salted licorice, however, doesn’t actually contain any salt. The brininess comes from the chemical ammonium chloride, so salted licorice is often called salmiakki, the Finish word for ammonium chloride. Modern salty licorice ranges in color from light brown to deep black, and it may be chewy or hard. Salted licorice is popular in Sweden, of course, as well as The Netherlands, Finland, Denmark, and Germany.

What is so enticing about salted licorice for Scandinavians? Consider the classic dishes gravlax or pickled herring. Bitter saltiness is deeply embedded in Scandinavian cuisine and home cooking, so a salty flavor is intertwined with notions of comfort and home. Curing meat and fish with salt during the long winter months is standard practice for many Scandinavians in past and present time, so an affinity for salt is deeply rooted in the Scandinavian palette.

On the other hand, salty licorice could merely exist as national entertainment. Many Scandinavians admit to enjoy feeding salty licorice to tourists just to watch them squirm. Some say it’s almost a national sport!

Most Swedes consume salted licorice as typical candy, but many also enjoy Turkish Pepper Shots, which are hard salted licorice popped into a shot of vodka. If you’re hooked to the flavor, it’s easy to want to infuse everything with salmiakki. However, too much licorice can cause a spike in blood pressure, so be careful not to overdo it.

Salty licorice is a unique treat for a large part of the world. It acts to demonstrate the diversity of global food preferences and the fascinating ways in which tastes are formed through the forces of climate, culture, and ecology.

Have you ever tried salty licorice? What was your experience like?

 

Featured Recipe

Image by Rod Waddington Dinner

By Suzannah Schneider

Injera

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Meet the Team

About The Team

Whether it’s finding the best goat tacos in LA, spotting a well-worn vintage bag in Sweden, or interviewing the “crab man” selling seafood on a corner in Harlem, we tell stories seen from Chef Marcus Samuelsson‘s point of view. MarcusSamuelsson.com strives to create conversations about food, nutrition, culture, art, and design. We want to find Read More

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Red Rooster Harlem
Ginny’s Supper Club
Uptown Brasserie
American Table Cafe and Bar
Kitchen and Table
American Table Brasserie and Bar
Norda
Marc Burger