ContestCookbooks

Marcus Off Duty Pre-Order Giveaway!!

By Marcus Samuelsson | September 29, 2014

Marcus in Harlem

I’m so excited for Marcus Off Duty: The Recipes I Cook at Home, that I’m offering a special promotion with the book’s publisher, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH).

For pre-orders of MARCUS OFF DUTY, HMH will send you a bookplate signed by me that can be inserted in your book.

When you pre-order MARCUS OFF DUTY from an online retailer or in-person bookstore, send a copy of your receipt to hmhcooks@gmail.com (a photo of the receipt is acceptable.)

Be sure to include your mailing address. US participants only.

Signed bookplates are available while supply lasts, so be sure to enter ASAP!

Recipe Roundup

My Favorite Mash-Ups

By Marcus Samuelsson | August 19, 2014

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I love twists on classic cuisine. My style of cooking blends culture, contrasts flavors, and plays with new styles of eating. It’s always been my methodology. That’s why I’m so excited for the second episode of my new show, The Feed. The episode, “Mashed Up Dishes & Food Design Wishes,” has Max Silvestri, Gail Simmons, and me crafting daring new food combinations. In preparation for the airing of the episode, I’ve compiled a few of my best food mash-up recipes below. Give them a try for something different, and make sure to tune into The Feed on Thursday, August 21, at 10 PM Eastern Time.

Korean Wonton Tacos with Napa Slaw

Swede Doggy Dog with Shrimp Salad 

Chai Toddy

Corn Pancakes with Chili-Covered Gravlax

News

The Feed Premieres this Thursday, August 21st at 10PM EST on FYI Network

By Marcus Samuelsson | August 18, 2014

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I am so excited to announce that my new show, The Feed will begin airing on Thursday, August 21st with back-to-back episodes at 10PM EST on FYI. Together with Top Chef‘s Gail Simmons and comedian Max Silvestri, I’ll be navigating NYC’s latest food trends in this one of a kind culinary adventure. Part talk show, part challenge,The Feed aims to open up viewers to unique culinary experiences and try something different.

In episode 1, “Ghostly Meals & Food with Wheels,” we attempt to solve the mystery of phantom cuisine and shake up the norms of food to go. Episode 2, “Mashed Up Dishes & Food Design Wishes,” has Max, Gail, and I designing daring new food combinations and gadgets.

Tune in this Thursday, August 21 at 10 pm Eastern Time to check out the series premiere of The Feed. Click here for more information and airdates, and enjoy the preview clip below!

Food Stories

Swedish Salty Licorice

By Suzannah Schneider | August 15, 2014

Image by /kallu

It’s unfathomable to most, coveted by some. Enthusiasts keep an emergency stash of the stuff in their purse; others take a nibble and promptly spit it out. It elicits passion, nostalgia, pain, discomfort, and satisfaction.

Ah, yes, Swedish salty licorice.

Swedish candy is notoriously fantastic, but salted licorice is the black sheep of the otherwise delectable family of gummy sweets. The stuff is potent and undoubtedly polarizing.

Licorice itself is the root of a plant called Glycyrrhiza glabra that is native to Spain, Italy, and Asia. The plant contains a component that is 20-40 times sweeter than sugar, so it is logical flavoring option for candy.

No one quite knows how or why licorice candy was first combined with a salty flavor, but its history as a confectionary began in Scandinavia in the 1930s. Salted licorice, however, doesn’t actually contain any salt. The brininess comes from the chemical ammonium chloride, so salted licorice is often called salmiakki, the Finish word for ammonium chloride. Modern salty licorice ranges in color from light brown to deep black, and it may be chewy or hard. Salted licorice is popular in Sweden, of course, as well as The Netherlands, Finland, Denmark, and Germany.

What is so enticing about salted licorice for Scandinavians? Consider the classic dishes gravlax or pickled herring. Bitter saltiness is deeply embedded in Scandinavian cuisine and home cooking, so a salty flavor is intertwined with notions of comfort and home. Curing meat and fish with salt during the long winter months is standard practice for many Scandinavians in past and present time, so an affinity for salt is deeply rooted in the Scandinavian palette.

On the other hand, salty licorice could merely exist as national entertainment. Many Scandinavians admit to enjoy feeding salty licorice to tourists just to watch them squirm. Some say it’s almost a national sport!

Most Swedes consume salted licorice as typical candy, but many also enjoy Turkish Pepper Shots, which are hard salted licorice popped into a shot of vodka. If you’re hooked to the flavor, it’s easy to want to infuse everything with salmiakki. However, too much licorice can cause a spike in blood pressure, so be careful not to overdo it.

Salty licorice is a unique treat for a large part of the world. It acts to demonstrate the diversity of global food preferences and the fascinating ways in which tastes are formed through the forces of climate, culture, and ecology.

Have you ever tried salty licorice? What was your experience like?

 

Farmer's Market

Celebrating Summer at the 125th Street Farmers’ Market

By Suzannah Schneider | August 11, 2014

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Plums and peaches

The 125th Street Farmers’ Market is one of the best places to be this time of year. The summer growing season peaks in late July into August, so the market is bursting with the vibrant colors and aromas of produce like tomatoes, peaches, eggplant, beans, plums, and corn. The market also features all kinds of treats including grass-fed meats, hard cider, free-range eggs, jewelry, natural body products, fresh breads, and informational tents for alternative energy sources. There’s also fantastic live music courtesy of Red Rooster Harlem, Ginny’s Supper Club, and Harlem Community Development Corporation.

There’s a whole lotta goodness in this slice of Harlem!

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Farmers’ markets are fantastic because they offer such unique produce. Sure, you can purchase your typical apples and carrots, but interesting plants like cranberry beans (above), green plums, or yellow string beans (below) are also available at a fair price.

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The 125th Street Farmers’ Market is a project of Governor Cuomo’s FreshConnect initiative to bring fresh food from New York farms to underserved communities throughout New York. Almost 1.5 million New Yorkers live in an area with limited grocery store access, also known as “food deserts.” FreshConnect aims to combat this problem through the “FreshConnect Checks” program. The project provides a $2 rebate check for every $5 in SNAP benefits (formerly known as “Food Stamps”) spent at the market. This means that everyone can have access to local, sustainably-grown, delicious food.

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What we love here at Marcus Samuelsson Group about farmers’ markets is how they connect us to nature. We live in New York City  surrounded by concrete instead of soil, skyscrapers instead of trees. Sometimes we forget there’s a whole natural world out there! Farmers’ markets connect us to the environment in a very tangible and delicious way. We’re reminded of how scrumptious seasonal produce can be.

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We hope to see you at the 125th Street Farmers’ Market on Tuesdays through November 25, 2104 from 10 am to 7 pm, rain or shine on the corner of 125th Street and Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Blvd.!

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Community

Citi Kids with Mr. Met, Michelle Yu and Me

By Marcus Samuelsson | July 31, 2014

Citi Kids in the Jackie Robinson Rotunda
Photo by Steve Campbell

Yesterday I had the privilege of visiting a very special group of kids at Citi Field. With my friend Michelle Yu of SNY, I spoke to over 100 kids from the Bronx, Manhattan and Queens about the importance of Jackie Robinson’s nine values: Courage, Excellence, Persistence, Justice, Teamwork, Commitment, Citizenship, Determination and Integrity. Other speakers included scholars and volunteers of the Jackie Robinson Foundation who encouraged Citi Kids to persevere and dream big.

The kids also got a tour of Citi Field, tickets to the game and snacks from the park’s infamous concession stands. Two of Citi Kids made it onto the field and into the dugout with me before the game– cheering me on for the ceremonial First Pitch. I had a great time and doing this on behalf of City Harvest was the perfect way to spend my first visit to Citi Field and my very first Mets game.

 

Featured Recipe

Image by Rod Waddington Dinner

By Suzannah Schneider

Injera

More Recipes

Meet the Team

About The Team

Whether it’s finding the best goat tacos in LA, spotting a well-worn vintage bag in Sweden, or interviewing the “crab man” selling seafood on a corner in Harlem, we tell stories seen from Chef Marcus Samuelsson‘s point of view. MarcusSamuelsson.com strives to create conversations about food, nutrition, culture, art, and design. We want to find Read More

Restaurants

Red Rooster Harlem
Ginny’s Supper Club
Uptown Brasserie
American Table Cafe and Bar
Kitchen and Table
American Table Brasserie and Bar
Norda
Marc Burger