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A Talented Harlem Student Enjoys a Pastry Internship with Red Rooster

By Suzannah Schneider | July 29, 2014

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Jake hard at work in the Red Rooster Kitchen

In May, Marcus met an impressive young man named Jacob at Celebrate Northside! The Northside Center for Child Development 68th Anniversary Gala. Marcus was so moved by Jacob’s interest in cooking that he extended an internship to the 15 year-old aspiring chef. From Tuesday, July 15 through Wednesday, July 16 Jacob enjoyed a hands-on culinary experience within the pastry department at Red Rooster Harlem.

Jacob is a student at a rigorous college preparatory school in The Bronx. He loves science, especially chemistry and forensic sciences. His family is from the Dominican Republic, and he grew up learning how to cook dishes like fried sweet plantains and sorbets from his grandma and uncle. He’ll often make himself Dominican breakfast for dinner, which is a traditional dish of fried eggs, mashed plantains, fried salami, fried cheese, and fried sausage.

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Marcus spoke with Jacob about his aspirations as a chef

Jacob’s time with Red Rooster began early on Tuesday at 8:15 in the morning. He worked with our Pastry Chef Melissa Camacho making strawberry jam, cookies, cornbread, and peanut butter pie. He was appreciative of their patience, and really enjoyed working with the kind chefs. Jacob liked making cornbread because he makes a similar recipe at home with his uncle.

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Pastry Chef Melissa Camacho taught Jacob how to begin Peanut Butter Pie

For lunch, Jacob enjoyed Red Rooster’s famous Triple-Double Burger infused with bacon, Jarlsberg, and rooster sauce, with, of course, a side of French fries. He was surprised he was able to finish the gigantic sandwich, but loved every bite of it. Jacob wrapped up his first day on the job with a chat with Chef Mark Gandara, mapping out his dreams for the future. He spent his second day of the internship preparing peaches to practice his knife skills.

Jacob with Chef Mark Gandara

A four-day sleep-away basketball camp is coming up for Jacob at the end of this summer. Although he’s eager to learn more about pastry and cooking, Jacob’s looking forward to some rest and relaxation after two long days on his feet.

Food Stories

History of the New England Clambake

By Suzannah Schneider | July 21, 2014

Photo by andrewyang
Photo by andrewyang

Photo by andrewyang

Marcus is hosting a traditional New England clambake on the Jersey Shore this Saturday at The Atlantic City Food and Wine Festival. In preparing for the event, many of us here in the Marcus Samuelsson Group offices recently found ourselves quite curious about the custom. We turned to trusty Google to learn more, and wanted to share our findings with you.

Today, clambakes are no longer exclusive to New England, as they are incredibly popular in Ohio and even California. There are also endless variations in technique and ingredients. For instance, some clambakes include sausages and other meat. In the past, seafood was not considered an adequate protein source for the men doing the hard labor of digging and gathering for the clambake, so meat was added for energy. This is why some clam chowder includes ham bone or bacon. Other menu items for a clambake can include lobster, white potatoes, corn, and cold beer; the only universal item is steamed clams. Clambakes have also been streamlined in recent years with the use of enormous stainless-steel pots heated by propane burners.

We were astonished to learn that clambakes have been a tradition in New England for over 2,000 years. Native American tribes of states such as Massachusetts, Maine, and Connecticut have long cooked clams and lobsters in sand pits as means of subsistence. In fact, it is possible to still stumble upon remnants of historic cooking pits in Rhode Island.

A 1947 clambake in Pembroke, Massachusetts. Photo by Boston Public Library

A 1947 clambake in Pembroke, Massachusetts. Photo by Boston Public Library

A traditional clambake begins by digging a pit in the sand of the beach where the clams are gathered. The pit is a product of centuries past: Native Americans did not have massive cooking pots, so they used the earth as their cooking vessel. The pit is then filled with seaweed, lined with hot rocks or stones that have been heated until white-hot over a wood fire. Next, live clams, mussels, and lobsters are added, and the pit is covered with more seaweed and some sand. Finally, a wet tarp of canvas or plastic is laid over all until the food is cooked.

The end product of a clambake is not necessarily a decadent meal. Clambakes are the types of cultural traditions that don’t just feed the participants. Instead, they are deeply nourishing events for the individual and the community. Kathy Neustadt’s book Clambake paints a vivid picture of the Allen’s Neck Friends Meeting’s annual clambake in Dartmouth, Massachusetts, which has occurred on the third Thursday of August since 1888 (!). Neustadt discusses how the event is inclusive, relying on the abilities of every individual.  She also emphasizes how clambakes revere the surrounding environment, relying on the fertile soil and easy access to the ocean to create the custom. Clambakes exist as a reminder of ancestry as time marches on.

Few meals are as fulfilling as a clambake. It is an all-day activity that yields scrumptious results, but the long process and intricate cooking method creates a reverence for the tradition and its participants.

 

Food Stories

Black History Month: The History of Chicken and Waffles

By Marcus Samuelsson | February 20, 2014

(Photo by Maria G.)
(Photo by Maria G.)

(Photo by Maria G.)

The artistic and cultural explosion of the 1920’s and 30’s known as The Harlem Renaissance, also known as one of the most socially alive and creatively conscious eras of African-American history,  ignited a mighty wave of Black literary, musical and visual artistic expression introducing us to Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, jazz, tap dancing and yes, even chicken and waffles.   Read More

Food StoriesQ & A

Q&A: Dee Charboneau of Juice Served Here

By Tawnya Manion | October 10, 2013

Juice Served Here. Photo courtesy of Dee Charboneau

Three weeks ago, the juice scene in Los Angeles just got hotter. The fashion forward juice bar, Juice Served Here, opened on West Third Street bringing cold-pressed juices, nut milks, tonics, coffees, and raw dessert to the toothsome neighborhood of West Hollywood. Last week, I sat down with Head of Operations Dee Charboneau to talk about her ever ambitious entrepreneur spirit, and the opening of the much anticipated store front. Here’s what she had to say. 

Read More

Food StoriesQ & A

Q&A: Jack Summers of Sorel Liqueur

By Tawnya Manion | July 22, 2013

Sorel. (Photo Courtesy of Jack Summers)
Sorel. (Photo Courtesy of Jack Summers)

Sorel. (Photo Courtesy of Jack Summers)

Last week at the Slow Food NYC Event, “Spirits of New York”, I was lucky enough to catch up with Jack Summers, the creator and distiller of the hibiscus liqueur, Sorel. His concoction nods to the Caribbean island’s celebratory beverage drank by natives for hundreds of years. Sorel’s spicy complexity and multifaceted flavors make it a versatile mixer or a thirst-quenching refreshment served best as a slushy, over ice, or warm in a mug. I was fascinated to know how Jack got his start to create such an interesting libation, so I asked. Here’s what he had to say. Read More

Food StoriesQ & A

Q&A: Alison Cross of Boxcar Grocer

By Alexandra Fleischman | July 13, 2013

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alison cross, atlanta, boxcar grocer

Boxcar Grocer in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo Courtesy of Alison Cross)

I was lucky to have the chance to talk with Alison Cross, co-founder of Boxcar Grocer last week. Located in Atlanta, Georgia, the store partners with local farmers and producers to offer high-quality products in a neighborhood with few food stores. She and her brother Alphonzo Cross make an inspiring team, driven by their desire to make an impact and how much they care about their community. Read the text of my conversation with her, below, and check out Boxcar Grocer’s website for more information.   Read More

Food StoriesYes Chef

What’s Your Soul Food Remix?

By Marcus Samuelsson | July 9, 2013

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Korean ban chan at Plaza Market

Korean ban chan at Plaza Market

For the last four years, I’ve been able to travel throughout the country, meeting people and hearing their personal stories, and sharing my own. I’ve witnessed the history of artisan food in Philadelphia’s Reading Terminal Market, the artistic sensibility of Austin restauranteurs, and the budding food scene in Oakland, California. I’ve met with chefs, readers, fans, and cooks who all celebrate food and culture in their own ways, and want to share what they’re doing.

What’s become clear is that food is a lifeblood to all communities, and it’s been how I’ve been able to connect with everyone across cultures. Making and enjoying food is practicing our culture with family and friends, but it’s communicating it with everyone . Like great music, great food doesn’t have barriers between people. Read More

Food Stories

Animal Feed is Going Gourmet

By Christopher Stewart | July 8, 2013

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pigs, farmers, antibiotics, health,

Photo: Vicky T.

With the rising concern of GMO’s, animal health, and the effects of the food we are consuming at record numbers, I believe everyone has a concern about the foods that we digest. In the times of numerous restaurants opening up every day, and the constant want of a 24-hour restaurant, food is being produced faster and faster, even if it’s not the safest. Farmers are taking notice of their animals and switching up things for the better, not just for the animal, but for the customer as well. Gourmet animal feed is now the topic of conversation, and farmers are designing specialty feed for their animal’s health and enjoyment. Read More

Farmer's MarketFood Stories

The Sense of Morels

By Patrice Johnson | June 7, 2013

Morels

Morels, mushrooms, fried morels, spring vegetables, healthy

“These are really good,” my coworker spoke quietly, “Don’t tell anyone I gave them to you,” he added as he glanced around nervously. He pressed a brown bag into my hands and backed out of my office.

At home I opened the bag and golden morels spilled out on to the counter. The spores were aliens; scary creatures of mystery but not intrigue. In my early years, mushrooms represented the dark, dank unknown. I stored the fungi in the refrigerator until I was able to forget their existence, and eventually they were pitched. Read More

Food StoriesWhat To Eat And Drink

The Good Eats at Smorgasburg: Jack’s Chedbred

By Diana Tsuchida | May 31, 2013

cornbread, jack's chedbred, smorgasburg, jack sorock

cornbread, jack's chedbred, smorgasburg, jack sorock

How does a Midwestern jazz pianist turned lawyer then cornbread baker find himself selling the Southern staple at Brooklyn’s most competitive flea market? Ask Chedbred founder Jack Sorock and he isn’t quite sure himself, but he can trace the fixation back to a bed and breakfast spot in Colorado called the Baldpate Inn where his family vacationed every summer. The culinary cornerstone of each visit was a rich, indulgent cornbread that nearly bordered on dessert and though Sorock sees this as the recipe to beat, he’d rather not try. It touts two cans of creamed corn with twice as much fat, sugar and cheddar cheese as his own recipe. But sheer determination and countless tastings led to a recipe that tastes unmistakably close to the same nostalgic blend of textures without needing a triple bypass. Read More

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Whether it’s finding the best goat tacos in LA, spotting a well-worn vintage bag in Sweden, or interviewing the “crab man” selling seafood on a corner in Harlem, we tell stories seen from Chef Marcus Samuelsson‘s point of view. MarcusSamuelsson.com strives to create conversations about food, nutrition, culture, art, and design. We want to find Read More

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Red Rooster Harlem
Ginny’s Supper Club
Uptown Brasserie
American Table Cafe and Bar
Kitchen and Table
American Table Brasserie and Bar
Norda
Marc Burger