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Close as Kin: The Art of Sharing Food and a Table

By Jeannette Park | July 10, 2012

Outdoor dinner in Austin

Outdoor dinner in Austin

Perusing through the pages of a Kinfolk Magazine will transport you to a rustic fairytale of endless summer picnics that taste of freshly bottled honey, warm bread with jam placed upon long wooden family tables that seat up to twenty of your closest hungry friends. Getting swept up in the tranquility of it all is easy, and is precisely what founder Nathan Williams had in mind when he and a group of friends developed their exquisitely designed communal gatherings. We were able to snag a few precious moments with Williams to further explore the manifesto behind Kinfolk and why, more than ever, sharing good food, time and laughter with friends and family is a necessary life fulfillment. Read More

Food Stories

It’s Tea Time Somewhere: A Look Into Tea Cultures

By Emma Laperruque | July 5, 2012

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Photo: Jeremy Keith

According to Chinese legend, Emperor Chen-nung invented tea in 2374 BC–by accident. One summer day, he decided to relax beneath a shrub tree and place a bowl of boiling water beside him. Soon after, a soft breeze blew a few shrub leaves into the bowl, where they began to steep. After smelling the delicate aroma, Emperor Chen-nung tasted the infusion, and thus, tea was born.

Though the story remains up for debate, no one argues that the shrub Emperor Chen-nung sat under (the Camellia sinensis, or tea, tree) hails from China, nor that the country was the first to brew the drink. The popular modern method of infusion developed gradually, becoming prevalent by the Ming dynasty when drinking tea started to take on symbolic qualities. It began to signify more than a beverage, but a ritual, too, representing discipline and beauty. Read More

Food Stories

With Love to Helga

By Marcus Samuelsson | May 24, 2012

Marcus, 1983

I ask people all the time what is their earliest food memory. But when I turn this question on myself it would not be a single taste, but a smell—my grandmother’s house.

My Mormor worked as maid for upper-class Swedish families during two World Wars so she knew how to ration food. Bread could be used for three days (eaten fresh on day one, toast on day two, make croutons on day three) and she taught me not to waste any part when cooking meat, pork or poultry. This waste not, want not mentality might have its roots in survival, but it’s also weaved into preparing some of the most exotic delicacies. The first time I had fugu (blowfish) in Tokyo, I started my meal with fugu sashimi, went on to have it portions of the poisonous fish baked and fried, and ended my meal with a soup made from vegetables and the blowfish’s bones.

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Food Stories

The Root of the Solution

By Jeannette Park | May 24, 2012

Photo: eekim

Photo: eekim

“It’s made from concentrated ginseng. Do you know what that is?”

I look at the perky girl behind the beauty counter in amazement and almost laugh into her perfectly made-up face. Had she not even told me the super ingredient in the latest super cream, the distinct smell pervades so many childhood memories it’s hard to miss. “Here, try some,” she says dabbing a bit onto my hand. “It’s called Sulwhasoo and it’s made from ginseng, a plant grown in the Korean Peninsula. Apparently it is one of the most precious medicinal plants around.”

Growing up, sun and sand was always the preferred prescription for whatever ailed me. But with a mother who walked on the shady side of any street to prevent excess sun exposure to her admittedly flawless complexion, her cure-all was ginseng. Used in teas, elixirs and now beauty creams, the ginseng root has been known to reduce mental stress and anxiety, increase mental clarity and alertness, reduce fatigue, and improve athletic endurance. With these kind of benefits it’s a wonder ginseng isn’t more readily used in Western health regimes. But anyone who has experienced the fragrant root can attest to
why it’s not the most popular remedy.  Read More

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The Perfect Swedish Christmas Table

By Mahir Hossein | December 10, 2010

Christmas Table

In Sweden, Christmas entails a long celebration, from the beginning of December all the way through the middle of January. The days are very short, because it is so far north, so light is scarce. It’s no wonder that the traditions and food that we celebrate with are so important. Read More

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About The Team

Whether it’s finding the best goat tacos in LA, spotting a well-worn vintage bag in Sweden, or interviewing the “crab man” selling seafood on a corner in Harlem, we tell stories seen from Chef Marcus Samuelsson‘s point of view. MarcusSamuelsson.com strives to create conversations about food, nutrition, culture, art, and design. We want to find Read More

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Red Rooster Harlem
Ginny’s Supper Club
Uptown Brasserie
American Table Cafe and Bar
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American Table Brasserie and Bar
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