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Swedish American Chamber of Commerce Green Summit: From Farm to Fork

By Raquel Jacquez | November 17, 2015

Photo of Gail Simmons, Marcus Samuelsson, Emma Bengtsson, Fredrik Berselius and Amanda Cohen at the Swedish American Chamber of Commerce Green Summit - from Farm to Fork.
Photo of Gail Simmons, Marcus Samuelsson, Emma Bengtsson, Fredrik Berselius and Amanda Cohen at the Swedish American Chamber of Commerce Green Summit - from Farm to Fork.

Photo of Gail Simmons, Marcus Samuelsson, Emma Bengtsson, Fredrik Berselius and Amanda Cohen at the Swedish American Chamber of Commerce Green Summit – from Farm to Fork.

Just last week Marcus was in conversation with other Swedish restauranteurs at the Swedish American Chamber of Commerce Green Summit – from Farm to Fork.  Growing up in Sweden, Marcus has profound memories eating fresh fish and local foods that were the backbone of his diet as a child. Growing up in that environment allowed him to nurture his curiosity for the world around him and discover the multitude of connections between the environment and his family’s kitchen. Today, as a chef and restauranteur, Marcus uses his knowledge and awareness of the webbed supply chain in order to elevate the conversation around sustainability.

As a chef, Marcus has devoted so much of his energies toward growing sustainable models inside his restaurants in order to support the local communities where his restaurants reside. Whether he is in Stockholm, Bermuda or Harlem, Marcus says that each place has its own questions of sustainable practices and faces unique challenges based on the local markets and supply chain.  “We need to activate the farmers markets and hire from within the community in order to create sustainable practices,” says Marcus.  Red Rooster has been doing this since its inception and Marcus can recall the success that it has had in doing so. “Buying from the farmers market and purchasing ingredients that are relevant to the community is something chefs can do to activate the local economy. I see it when we create menu items at Red Rooster based on the availability of ingredients at the market,” Marcus said in response to a question about local practices from Gail Simmons, cookbook author and TV personality.

Other panelists agreed that chefs have a responsibility to link the produce from the market to the restaurant and broadcast that narrative for the larger public. Marcus was speaking at the Green Summit with Amanda Cohen, Fredrik Berselius, Emma Bengtsson and the conversation was facilitated by Gail Simmons.

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Join us at Rooster’s Market!

By Raquel Jacquez | November 3, 2015


Kick-off your holiday shopping uptown at Chef Marcus Samuelsson’s Rooster’s Market. This shopping event will feature some of NYC’s up and coming designers, collectors and artists. Come check off your wish list with us and enjoy complimentary mimosas and a special Rooster market menu you’re sure to love!

We are still looking for more vendors so send us a message if you’re interested in showcasing your work! Please send all inquiries to


Red Rooster Market on


ChefCommunityFood for ThoughtFood PoliticsNews

From a Chef’s Perspective: Marcus in Conversation with Tom Colicchio and Andrea Reusing at the New York Times’ Food for Tomorrow Conference

By Raquel Jacquez | October 22, 2015

Screen Shot 2015-10-22 at 3.35.48 PM

Screen Shot 2015-10-22 at 3.32.00 PM

This week, chefs, activists, policymakers, farmers and journalists convened for the New York Times’ Food for Tomorrow Conference at the Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture.

In a conversation facilitated by Sam Sifton (New York Times food editor), with Tom Colicchio (Craft Restaurants and Co-Founder of Food Policy Action) and Andrea Reusing (Lantern and The Durham), Marcus discussed the divide between what comes out of urban America and what is in and of urban America, particularly when we think about food as an expression of art, culture and history.

Marcus first began thinking about this because he wanted to find purpose in being a chef in Harlem – a community where there is a huge divide between the pleasures of good food and access to a dining experience that celebrates the community’s art, history and culture. From the beginning, Marcus says, he was thinking about these dynamics when he opened Red Rooster.

As a result of the industrialized and modern food system, the working poor have gained the convenience of cheap food, but it has come with a price. Marcus believes that we have traded the convenience of cheap food for the basic skills of cooking and preparing foods. In other words, we now have an entire generation of people lacking the knowledge and skills needed to prepare food for themselves and are, instead, stuck in a food system that has removed agency by marketing cheap food that is conveniently making us sick. Whether or not this trade-off was an intentional decision we made, is not the point. The point is that we are facing major consequences as a result of the design of our food system and we have to begin to think about how to combat the challenges together, as a community. Tom Colicchio agreed with Marcus and added, “We need to educate a population. We are a generation removed from actually having any skills at all in the kitchen and knowing where food comes from.”

While we need radically different policies in our food system in order to create access to healthy foods for the working poor, there are significant solutions that we can implement in our own neighborhoods to change the way people are thinking about food. “My food memories growing up, aside from my family, come from the lunches that I had at school where I really actually started to develop a real sense of flavor because it was real food – not what we have right now,” says Marcus. Imagine if, as Marcus suggests, the lunchroom actually resembled the complexity of flavors in America’s diverse population and we were serving children real food while simultaneously educating them about how to prepare it.

“The beauty of America,” as Marcus points out, “is that we are so complex and so different. We are one of the few countries in the world that don’t have one food identity. That is the beauty and also the complexity.” By intentionally evoking interest in flavor and ingredients, we could potentially have a fully engaged population who is intrigued by real food and has baseline knowledge about the food system. A generation that can cook will raise the awareness that we need in order to prioritize what is important for the environment, our communities and ourselves.

You can view all of the videos from the New York Times’ Food for Tomorrow Conference here.

CommunityFood for ThoughtFood PoliticsNews

Clinton Global Initiative – Call to Action

By Raquel Jacquez | October 8, 2015


During last month’s Clinton Global Initiative, Marcus joined a panel of experts to discuss the role of food and nutrition in global poverty and specifically, how chefs might be catalysts for change.

Poverty in America, as Marcus puts it, affects people differently than it does in his home country of Ethiopia. In America, we have extreme wealth that disconnects us from our food because cooking with real ingredients is expensive and perceived as inefficient in our busy lives. However, if we take the time to learn how to cook, he argues, everyone in the community will benefit. Further, Marcus challenges the audience to cook and eat based on a spiritual compass – meaning, eat things that relate to your own personal history and values. When we eat foods that are whole and seasonal, reusing ingredients throughout the week in order to avoid wasting food and overspending, we are satisfying our palate as well as our spiritual compass.

The strength in Marcus’ approach is his understanding that in order to be successful, we all need the tools to create lasting change in our own lives. Part of the reason that Marcus opened Red Rooster in Harlem was to not just change the restaurant footprint in the neighborhood, but to also highlight the complexities of poverty and malnutrition that exist in his own community. Watch Marcus discuss these issues in the video below or watch more videos from the 2015 Clinton Global Initiative here.


Streetbird Rotisserie is Officially Open!

By Becca Cory | April 6, 2015

Photo courtesy of Eye Swoon

Photo courtesy of Eye Swoon

I am thrilled to announce that as of Thursday, April 2nd, Streetbird Rotisserie is open to the public. Thanks to everyone who came out last week and over the weekend, it’s been an incredible few days and I’m glad you could all be a part of it.

For the first few weeks, we’ll be doing “Spring Training” and offering a limited menu. Some of my favorites include the Notti Greens, Sho’ Nuff Noodles, the Swediopian, and of course, the Rotisserie Chicken. Hope to see you in soon!

Streetbird Rotisserie
2149 Frederick Douglass
New York, NY
Hours: 11:30am – 10pm

Chasing FlavorsCookbooksMarcus Off DutyNews

Marcus Off Duty Nominated for a James Beard Award

By Becca Cory | March 24, 2015

Off  Duty Cover

Off  Duty Cover

Exciting news: my latest cookbook, Marcus Off Duty: The Recipes I Cook at Home, was just nominated for a James Beard Award! It is such an honor to see this book, full inspiration from friends and family and my reflections on chasing flavors, recognized by an organization as celebrated as the James Beard Foundation.

The nominations were announced this morning; Marcus Off Duty is one of three nominees in the General Cooking category. The full list of James Beard Foundation Book Awards nominees is below.



2015 James Beard Foundation Book Awards

For books published in English in 2014. Winners will be announced on April 24, 2015 at the Book,Broadcast & Journalism Awards Dinner on April 24th at Pier Sixty here in New York.

American Cooking

Sean Brock

The New England Kitchen: Fresh Takes on Seasonal Recipes
Erin Byers Murray and Jeremy Sewall
(Rizzoli New York)

Texas on the Table: People, Places, and Recipes Celebrating the Flavors of the Lone Star State
Terry Thompson-Anderson
(University of Texas Press)


Baking and Dessert

Baking Chez Moi: Recipes from My Paris Home to Your Home Anywhere
Dorie Greenspan
(Rux Martin/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

Della Fattoria Bread: 63 Foolproof Recipes for Yeasted, Enriched & Naturally Leavened Breads
Kathleen Weber

Flavor Flours: A New Way to Bake with Teff, Buckwheat, Sorghum, Other Whole & Ancient Grains, Nuts & Non-Wheat Flours
Alice Medrich



Death & Co: Modern Classic Cocktails, with More than 500 Recipes
Alex Day, Nick Fauchald, and David Kaplan
(Ten Speed Press)

Liquid Intelligence: The Art and Science of the Perfect Cocktail
Dave Arnold
(W. W. Norton & Company)

Sherry: A Modern Guide to the Wine World’s Best-Kept Secret, with Cocktails and Recipes
Talia Baiocchi
(Ten Speed Press)


Cooking from a Professional Point of View

Bar Tartine: Techniques & Recipes
Nicolaus Balla and Cortney Burns
(Chronicle Books)

Never Trust a Skinny Italian Chef
Massimo Bottura
(Phaidon Press)

Relæ: A Book of Ideas
Christian F. Puglisi
(Ten Speed Press)


Focus on Health

A Change of Appetite: Where Healthy Meets Delicious
Diana Henry
(Mitchell Beazley)

Cooking Light Mad Delicious: The Science of Making Healthy Food Taste Amazing
Keith Schroeder
(Oxmoor House)

Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans
Henry Fong and Michelle Tam
(Andrews McMeel Publishing)


General Cooking

The Kitchn Cookbook: Recipes, Kitchens & Tips to Inspire Your Cooking
Faith Durand and Sara Kate Gillingham
(Clarkson Potter)

Marcus Off Duty: The Recipes I Cook at Home
Marcus Samuelsson
(Rux Martin/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

Saveur: The New Classics Cookbook
The Editors of Saveur
(Weldon Owen)



The Cuban Table: A Celebration of Food, Flavors, and History
Ana Sofía Peláez
(St. Martin’s Press)

My Paris Kitchen: Recipes and Stories
David Lebovitz
(Ten Speed Press)

Yucatán: Recipes from a Culinary Expedition
David Sterling
(University of Texas Press)


In Her Kitchen: Stories and Recipes from Grandmas Around the World
Gabriele Galimberti
(Clarkson Potter)

A New Napa Cuisine
Photographer: Jen Munkvold and Taylor Peden
(Ten Speed Press)

Sherry: A Modern Guide to the Wine World’s Best-Kept Secret, with Cocktails and Recipes
Photographer: Ed Anderson
(Ten Speed Press)


Reference and Scholarship

Butchering Poultry, Rabbit, Lamb, Goat, and Pork: The Comprehensive Photographic Guide to Humane Slaughtering and Butchering
Adam Danforth
(Storey Publishing)

Inventing Baby Food: Taste, Health, and the Industrialization of the American Diet
Amy Bentley
(University of California Press)

The Spice & Herb Bible (Third Edition)
Ian and Kate Hemphill
(Robert Rose)


Single Subject

Bitter: A Taste of the World’s Most Dangerous Flavor, with Recipes
Jennifer McLagan
(Ten Speed Press)

Charcutería: The Soul of Spain
Jeffrey Weiss
(Agate Surrey)

Egg: A Culinary Exploration of the World’s Most Versatile Ingredient
Michael Ruhlman
(Little, Brown and Company)


Vegetable Focused and Vegetarian

At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen: Celebrating the Art of Eating Well
Amy Chaplin
(Roost Books)

Plenty More: Vibrant Vegetable Cooking from London’s Ottolenghi
Yotam Ottolenghi
(Ten Speed Press)

Vegetarian Dinner Parties: 150 Meatless Meals Good Enough to Serve to Company
Mark Scarbrough and Bruce Weinstein
(Rodale Books)


Writing and Literature

The Chain: Farm, Factory, and the Fate of Our Food
Ted Genoways
(HarperCollins Publishers)

The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu
Dan Jurafsky
(W. W. Norton & Company)

The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food
Dan Barber
(Penguin Press)

The winner of the Cookbook of the Year Award and the Cookbook Hall of Fame inductee will be announced on April 24, 2015.





The Feed Premieres this Thursday, August 21st at 10PM EST on FYI Network

By Marcus Samuelsson | August 18, 2014

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I am so excited to announce that my new show, The Feed will begin airing on Thursday, August 21st with back-to-back episodes at 10PM EST on FYI. Together with Top Chef‘s Gail Simmons and comedian Max Silvestri, I’ll be navigating NYC’s latest food trends in this one of a kind culinary adventure. Part talk show, part challenge,The Feed aims to open up viewers to unique culinary experiences and try something different.

In episode 1, “Ghostly Meals & Food with Wheels,” we attempt to solve the mystery of phantom cuisine and shake up the norms of food to go. Episode 2, “Mashed Up Dishes & Food Design Wishes,” has Max, Gail, and I designing daring new food combinations and gadgets.

Tune in this Thursday, August 21 at 10 pm Eastern Time to check out the series premiere of The Feed. Click here for more information and airdates, and enjoy the preview clip below!

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A Talented Harlem Student Enjoys a Pastry Internship with Red Rooster

By Suzannah Schneider | July 29, 2014


Jake hard at work in the Red Rooster Kitchen

In May, Marcus met an impressive young man named Jacob at Celebrate Northside! The Northside Center for Child Development 68th Anniversary Gala. Marcus was so moved by Jacob’s interest in cooking that he extended an internship to the 15 year-old aspiring chef. From Tuesday, July 15 through Wednesday, July 16 Jacob enjoyed a hands-on culinary experience within the pastry department at Red Rooster Harlem.

Jacob is a student at a rigorous college preparatory school in The Bronx. He loves science, especially chemistry and forensic sciences. His family is from the Dominican Republic, and he grew up learning how to cook dishes like fried sweet plantains and sorbets from his grandma and uncle. He’ll often make himself Dominican breakfast for dinner, which is a traditional dish of fried eggs, mashed plantains, fried salami, fried cheese, and fried sausage.


Marcus spoke with Jacob about his aspirations as a chef

Jacob’s time with Red Rooster began early on Tuesday at 8:15 in the morning. He worked with our Pastry Chef Melissa Camacho making strawberry jam, cookies, cornbread, and peanut butter pie. He was appreciative of their patience, and really enjoyed working with the kind chefs. Jacob liked making cornbread because he makes a similar recipe at home with his uncle.


Pastry Chef Melissa Camacho taught Jacob how to begin Peanut Butter Pie

For lunch, Jacob enjoyed Red Rooster’s famous Triple-Double Burger infused with bacon, Jarlsberg, and rooster sauce, with, of course, a side of French fries. He was surprised he was able to finish the gigantic sandwich, but loved every bite of it. Jacob wrapped up his first day on the job with a chat with Chef Mark Gandara, mapping out his dreams for the future. He spent his second day of the internship preparing peaches to practice his knife skills.

Jacob with Chef Mark Gandara

A four-day sleep-away basketball camp is coming up for Jacob at the end of this summer. Although he’s eager to learn more about pastry and cooking, Jacob’s looking forward to some rest and relaxation after two long days on his feet.


Catching Up with HEAF’s 2014 Learning for Social Impact Course

By Marcus Samuelsson | July 28, 2014

Photo courtesy of HEAF

Last month a group of students from Harlem Educational Activities Fund (HEAF) spent an afternoon with me in Ginny’s Supper Club to learn about Swedish food and culture. The discussion and cooking demonstration were in preparation for the students’ trip to Stockholm as part of HEAF’s Learning for Social Impact cultural literacy course. I recently caught up with Jadira Mora, HEAF’s Program Coordinator of College Quest, to hear more about the group’s adventures in my homeland.

On a bike tour of the Royal National City Park. Photo courtesy of HEAF

The students kicked off their trip with an invigorating bike tour of the Royal National City Park. They got to see the area the way most Scandinavians do – by bicycle. Other trip highlights include a tour of Stockholm City Hall, a fascinating lesson on the history of Swedish music, a visit with the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, and a meeting with King Entertainment, the creators of Candy Crush Saga. Additionally, the LSI class enjoyed conversations with The Arbitration Institute of the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce over a traditional Swedish Fika (coffee break). The HEAF students also met kids their own age to compare personal experiences, and attended the first World Cup game screening put on by Ortens Favoriter, a youth organization in the suburbs. I wish I could’ve been there!

Enjoying a traditional Swedish Fika with The Arbitration Institute of the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce. Photo courtesy of HEAF

Jadira facilitated debriefings each night so the students could discuss their experiences of the day. The students faced a lot of culture shock, and were surprised to encounter a different kind of diversity in Sweden. They found that diversity often relates to different nationalities instead of different colors of skin.

Of course, the HEAF students thoroughly enjoyed Swedish cuisine. They ate meatballs similar to the kind I made with them, enjoyed a lot of fish, and even tried Gubbröra, which is a traditional Swedish anchovy dish that translates to “Old Man’s Mix.” The students were surprised at the large portion sizes that were available in restaurants, and were delighted by Swedish chocolate. (We do have the best candy!)

It was great to hear about the students’ trip, and it was an honor to work with them beforehand to discuss my experience growing up in Sweden. I hope to see my HEAF friends again soon.

Photo courtesy of HEAF

Photo courtesy of HEAF

ChefNewsThe Roo

HEAF Comes to Red Rooster

By ADMIN | June 26, 2014

photo 2
photo 2

Photo Courtesy of Jeannette Park

On Monday, June 23rd, a group of 17 students from Harlem Educational Activities Fund (HEAF) came to Ginny’s Supper Club to participate in a cooking demo and discussion with Chef Marcus Samuelsson. The students will head off to Stockholm, Sweden this Saturday as a part of HEAF’s Learning for Social Impact (LSI) course.

With the assistance of a few brave students, Marcus demonstrated traditional Swedish foods including Swedish Meatballs and Pytt I Panna, a Swedish hash made with potatoes and minced meat.

Marcus discussed his experiences growing up in Sweden, contemporary Swedish culture, and the ways that sustainability and economic history have shaped Swedish cuisine. The students asked exciting questions, and we can’t wait to hear all about their trip! Trevlig resa!


Featured Recipe

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Meet the Team

About The Team

Whether it’s finding the best goat tacos in LA, spotting a well-worn vintage bag in Sweden, or interviewing the “crab man” selling seafood on a corner in Harlem, we tell stories seen from Chef Marcus Samuelsson‘s point of view. strives to create conversations about food, nutrition, culture, art, and design. We want to find Read More


Streetbird Rotisserie
Marcus’ Bermuda
Eatery Social Taqueria
Red Rooster Harlem
Ginny’s Supper Club
Uptown Brasserie
American Table Cafe and Bar
Kitchen and Table
American Table Brasserie and Bar
Marc Burger