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Tweaking an American Classic

By admin | August 10, 2011

Photo: Rachel Tayse

BY MATT ESSERT

Everyone loves ketchup. It’s something you grow up with and use as much as possible when you’re a kid. But as some people get older, they unfortunately tend to view ketchup negatively. Thinking of it as pedestrian or too simple, a lot of foodies want something more interesting. But there are others who disagree.

An article in today’s New York Times highlighted Chef Jose Andres and his efforts at his new pop-up restaurant, America Eats Tavern, to reinvent ketchup and reinvigorate it as a beloved American staple. At the restaurant, Chef Andres and his team have created a variety of ketchups suited to the different dishes on his menu. Selections like blueberry, mushroom, red currant, and yellow tomato are among the creative offerings made from local and foraged ingredients.

The ketchup creations at America Eats Tavern are a prime example of the ketchup renaissance going on around the country. In order to regain the authentic appeal of one of America’s favorite condiments, companies like Sir Kensington’s Gourmet Scooping Ketchup, Katchkie Ketchup, and Stonewall Kitchens’ Country Ketchup have been developing their own ketchups to sell as an alternative to the more common Heinz or Hunt’s offerings.

A lot of what these companies are really trying to do is bring ketchup back to the basic sauce it once was. Although we consume a lot of store-bought ketchup in this country a healthier option can be making your own at home. Making your own ketchup can actually be easy and not to mention, get you props from friends and family when you whip it out at your next BBQ. If you want bragging rights from your own homemade Ketchup, check out Food Republic’s Homemade Ketchup Recipe.

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