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White Tea Recipe – Drink Day Wednesday with Elizabetta

By mahir | October 6, 2010

Hello everyone! This week concludes our four part series on tea. I think it’s fitting that we leave the tea with the most benefits of all (yes even more than green tea) till the end. It’s teatime!

White Tea:

White tea comes from the Camilla Sinensis plant and like the green tea is not left to oxidize, instead it is picked when it’s young and is sun dried or steam dried.  This drying process retains more of the antioxidants arguably making it the most beneficial off all teas. Although still caffeinated it has considerably less caffeine then black and green tea.

White tea is subtle and often times sweet so it is best enjoyed without anything added so that you may pick out the delicate flavor profiles from the young buds of the plant. A relatively young tea cultivated in the late eighteenth century in the Fujian province of China white tea is gaining popularity and momentum in the last decade and can be found as a base for many tea beverages.

This week I though I’d share with you a special recipe to cleanse the palate…white tea sorbet!

3 cups of water (spring water is ideal)

[1] 2 cups of whole cane sugar

Half an ounce of white loose-leaf tea (I recommend a Ceylon white tea which has peach undertones or the Darjeeling white tea which has hints of white wine)

Juice from an organic lime

Bring water to a boil (180F) then add tea leaves and let steep for 3 minutes. Strain and add sugar to tea stirring until dissolved.

Add lime juice and chill for an hour then pour into an ice cream maker. Garnish and serve with raspberries, blackberries, mint or my personal favorite…almond biscotti!

Scoop and enjoy!

Until next week, breathe well and be well!

[1]  Quarter cup of stevia can be substituted here.

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