no cook

No-Cook Recipe: Preserved Lemon Cocktail

By Alexandra Fleischman | August 6, 2013

preserved lemons, no cook

Cooking is relaxing for me, as it is for so many, and jam-making has always done the trick. The patience required to make strawberry jam is like a breathing exercise in yoga–you calm down, focus, and soon enough you’re left feeling less stressed-out and a lot less tense. But recently, when I wanted to chill out over a bubbling pan of fruit and sugar, I couldn’t bring myself to do it to myself. Or to my roommate. After all, jam needs heat, and my kitchen rests at a way-above-comfortable hot.

The solution: Preserved Lemons. A staple in Moroccan flavor profiles, lemons get packed in salt, and develop a rich, interesting (and versatile) flavor. You’ll find them in tagines, but you can also add a bit of the lemon rind to pesto for a deeper flavor, or chop it up in a pasta dish or grain salad.

But to keep on relaxing, try adding a bit of the brine to a cocktail for a surprising addition of salt.

No-Cook Recipe: Peach-Ginger Lassi

By Alexandra Fleischman | July 31, 2013

Photo: The Purple Food

In the summer, my blender gets a lot of use; after all, you get to combine flavors without much work on your end– all in soups, smoothies, sauces, and drinks. When that gets boring, turning to another cuisine can help (especially for smoothies– I don’t believe in the mix-in-all-the-fruit-around philosophy).

For guidance, then, take a look at the lassi. This cold, yogurt-based soft drink packs a load of probiotics into a a smoothie-milkshake hybrid. If you’re not a fan of yogurt, consider trying your hand at horchata, which uses rice, almonds, or sesame seeds for its creamy base.

For more no-cook summer recipes, click here.

No-Cook Recipe: Sauvignon Blanc-Apricot Popsicles

By Alexandra Fleischman | July 25, 2013

Photo: alfleischman

Last week, I shared one of my favorite summertime ways to enjoy a drink: frozen. This week, we’re at it again, except this time I’m starting out with wine. Like a glass of sangria, clerico, or even a spritzer, this is wine in a different (read: more fun, less classy) form. And it’s still really, really good.

The ingredient measurements are left open. Depending on the size of your popsicle mold, you’ll need more or less than I used. (Mine makes three 2-0z. pops in one go, which is pretty small.) But if you end up with leftovers, don’t worry. Unless you end up imbibing what’s left in the cup, make a granita. Pour the leftover onto a plate or sheet pan, freeze, and then scrape off with a fork. Then, serve like a shaved ice and enjoy with a spoon.

This doesn’t yield a sugary popsicle. If you think you’ll want it on the sweeter side, add more sugar or more juice. You don’t need the best wine, either, because you’ll be adding both sugar and juice. (I didn’t even need a bottle opener for what I bought.)

If kids will be enjoying with you, don’t miss these tips for making non-alcoholic popsicles, too.

For more Summer Friendly, No-Cook recipes, click here

Massaged Kale Salad Recipe

By Alexandra Fleischman | June 27, 2013

massaged kale, kale, tahini, lemon, kale salad, pomegranate seeds, no cook, recipe, kale recipe

massaged kale, kale, tahini, lemon, kale salad, pomegranate seeds, no cook, recipe, kale recipe

A side of sautéed greens is an easy, elegant classic. But when I made them last week, I regretted it. Unfortunately, even one burner on the stove quickly heats up my small apartment more than one measly window unit can handle.

I turn to a vegetable that wilts beautifully without heat—the one and only, superfood kale. Massaged kale isn’t cooked, per se, but the dressing is worked into the leaves, taking on both the flavor and a softer texture.

How long the kale is massaged controls the softness—most massaged kale salads call for five minutes or less of massaging. Personally, I like my kale a lot softer, massaged for fifteen or more. Tahini adds an undeniable rich, nutty flavor and creamy texture that elevates this side to a memorable (not to mention addictive) dish. The antioxidant-packed pomegranate seeds brighten up the flavor profile, as do the mint and lemon juice.

For more sides of greens, see these recipes:

Healthy Spring Sautee of Overwintered Spinach, Leeks and Carrots

Braised Collard Greens with Masala Caramelized Onions

Quinoa & Greens

Grilled Treviso with Watercress and Creamy Blue Cheese

 

Rhubarb and Avocado Ceviche Recipe

By Alexandra Fleischman | June 26, 2013

ceviche

Rarely do I attempt to serve any type of raw meat or fish. Order it in a restaurant, and at least the chef is responsible for making sure no one gets sick. None of that pressure on me, thank you.

But I love ceviche for how refreshing and light it is, and when it occurred to me that, of course, no cooking is involved, I got past my skittishness, and tried it.

This recipe uses rhubarb juice, which is surprisingly lighter and sweeter than one would expect from raw rhubarb. Nevertheless, it’s acidic enough to use as the marinade. Jalapeños add a little heat, and the scallions add the necessary crunch.

For more ceviche recipes, try:

Sea Scallop Ceviche

Ceviche Nikkei

Crayfish and Crab Ceviche

No-Bake Brownies Recipe

By Alexandra Fleischman | June 19, 2013

Brownies_0021 copy

Brownies_0021 copyThere’s something so special about baking for someone, whether it’s a birthday girl, an under-the-weather colleague, or a boyfriend with a new promotion. Unless, that is, your oven is off limits. No oven, no stove, no brownies.

However, this week, I tried my hand at non-baked brownies. Raw desserts are fascinating to me–the creative substitutions for categorically baked dishes remind me to keep an open mind in the kitchen. This recipe surprised me as well. For a brownie made of melted chocolate, graham crackers, nuts, cocoa powder, and sweetened condensed milk (no eggs, no vanilla extract, no flour?), they do taste like the real thing. The texture is not cake like, but still nice. They’re fudgier than normal brownies, and they should be served cold.

Adapted from Faith Durand’s No-Bake Triple-Chocolate Brownies on Food52.com

no bake brownies

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