vegetarian

Asparagus-Radish Salad Recipe

By Patrice Johnson | April 15, 2013

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Signs of spring always include fresh local asparagus making its first appearance in the market. I am set in my ways when it comes to preparing asparagus: roasted or grilled until just tender, then served with a squeeze of fresh lemon and a grating of aged cheese such as Parmigiano-Reggiano. For a cool spring twist, I love raw asparagus salad. Peeling the stems into ribbons can be painstaking, but it is well worth the trouble.

asparagus, radish, salad, asparagus salad

For more Asparagus recipes:

Fettuccine Tangle with Spring Asparagus Puree

Penne with Roasted Asparagus and Goat Cheese

Spring Asparagus Tart

Asparagus Lasagne

Asparagus with Citrus Vinaigrette

Roasted Baby Artichokes with Garlic Recipe

By Kendall Kish | March 18, 2013

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One of the best parts of spring is when the new crop of seasonal vegetables grace us with their presence at the market. Artichokes are among the first vegetables to appear in the early spring, and are one of those versatile vegetables that can stand up on it’s own as a side dish, as well as an ingredient in recipes.

Baby artichokes are so easy to prepare and for the most part, can be eaten whole. Just trim the tops and a few outer layers of the leaves, and they are ready to go. This artichoke recipe is a wonderful side dish to roasted chicken or fish, or can be tossed with pasta and sun dried tomatoes for a complete meal.

Friday Try-day: Warm Cauliflower Salad Recipe

By Ashley Beck | March 8, 2013

photo by: esimpraim

Escarole, cauliflower, almonds, and gruyere…Go! Okay so maybe I watch Chopped a little too often, but I can’t help how much it inspires me to get creative and think outside the box. Whenever I look into the fridge and see miss-matched remnants I take it as a challenge to create something delicious!

Cauliflower is a great vegetable to eat during this time of year as it is still in season, and is a filling component when added to a salad. Because it tends to be a bit bland when raw, I decided it best to par-boil it to enhance the flavor and mouth feel. The acidity of the dressing goes well with the nuttiness of the almonds and creaminess of the cauliflower. Lastly, using a sturdy lettuce like escarole, radicchio, or kale is optimal in a warm salad as it holds up to the heat of the cauliflower without becoming soggy.

Photo: esimpraim

Kale and Quinoa Salad with Roasted Beets

By Kendall Kish | March 4, 2013

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This warm salad is perfectly healthy, delicious, and easy to make. Steaming the kale atop the quinoa during the last 5 minutes of cooking makes this one-pot recipe all the worthwhile.  The earthy flavors of each ingredient compliment each other wonderfully – you’re going to want to make this! Read More

Roasted Sweet Potato Salad with Chili Dressing Recipe

By Joanne Bruno | December 10, 2012

Photo: Joanne Bruno

Photo: Joanne Bruno

I’ve been focusing a lot on salad consumption lately to get me through the few weeks in-between one holiday season and another with my skinny jeans still intact. Don’t get me wrong, my days are still dotted with cookie consumption, but I like to think I’m evening it all out by devouring a plate full of veggies on a daily basis.

My favorite salads are the kinds where each bite is filled with bursts of flavor and texture, not just plain old lettuce, forkful after forkful. Case in point – this roasted sweet potato salad, which is hearty, healthy and satisfying all in one. It has a hint of heat and tang from the jalapeno-lime dressing that makes the sweet potatoes and bell peppers taste all the more vibrant, while the black beans ground the salad, adding protein and heft. This is definitely the kind of salad you’ll look forward to eating day after day, so much so that you won’t even miss the cookie excess. Pinky swear.

Photo: Joanne Bruno

Adapted from Mark Bittman

Joanne Bruno is a food writer and third year MD/PhD student. Find more of delicious ramblings over at her blog: Eats Well With Others

Swiss Chard and Saffron Tart Recipe

By Joanne Bruno | December 3, 2012

Swiss Chard and Saffron Tart

I love the idea of savory tarts, but we’re reaching that point in the holiday season when I am utterly weary of cutting butter into flour and chilling for two hours, only to then fail to roll out a pie crust that doesn’t look like a patchwork quilt. Plus, I’m getting enough saturated fat at dessert…I don’t really need it for lunch and dinner, too.

This week, I discovered yeasted tart dough and my whole worldview shifted. Not only is it easy to throw together, but there is nary a tablespoon of butter in sight making it figure-friendly. While not quite as flaky as as a butter-based crust, it is a bit heartier, which pairs perfectly with this saffron-infused swiss chard filling. Now you truly can have your “pie” and eat it too.

Joanne Bruno is a food writer and third year MD/PhD student. Find more of delicious ramblings over at her blog: Eats Well With Others

Serves 6, adapted from The Greens Cookbook

Autumn Ratatouille Recipe

By Joanne Bruno | October 29, 2012

Photo: Joanne Bruno

Photo: Joanne Bruno

Even though I love all of the components of a typical end-of-summer ratatouille on their own — eggplant, zucchini, bell peppers, tomatoes — something happens when they are brought together in stew form that spurs my disinterest.

Perhaps it’s that it just doesn’t feel right eating such a hearty thick dish while the days are still long and the heat is almost more than you can bear.

Enter this autumn ratatouille.  It incorporates some of fall’s best vegetables into it’s mix so that you can make it as soon as the temperatures start to dip.  Although after tasting it in all of its richly flavored glory…you might just be tempted to make/buy it year round.  Do it. I won’t blame you.

Photo: Joanne Bruno

Recipe adapted from Ottolenghi’s Plenty

Joanne Bruno is a food writer and third year MD/PhD student. Find more of her delicious ramblings over at her blog: Eats Well With Others.

Curried Red Lentil Burgers and Mango Slaw Recipe

By Joanne Bruno | October 22, 2012

Photo: Joanne Bruno

Photo: Joanne Bruno

These are some strange times in which we’re living.  Half the country is still in the throes of summer heat while the rest of us have to wear t-shirts and shorts to combat the midday sun but find ourselves reaching for our down jackets by the time the sun has set. Even harder than choosing an outfit for the day is deciding what to eat. Luckily, these veggie burgers combine the best of both seasons, making them the ideal transition food. They are light enough that they won’t weigh you down in the summery heat but they also contain enough spice that they’ll warm you from the inside once night falls. Not to mention that the mango slaw that is paired with them is one of the most delicious things I’ve ever tasted…and that’s saying a lot considering how deep my disdain for raw cabbage goes.

Photo: Joanne Bruno

Recipe adapted from Moosewood Restaurant: Cooking for Health.

Joanne Bruno is a food writer and third year MD/PhD student. Find more of her delicious ramblings over at her blog: Eats Well With Others.

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By Marcus Samuelsson

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Whether it’s finding the best goat tacos in LA, spotting a well-worn vintage bag in Sweden, or interviewing the “crab man” selling seafood on a corner in Harlem, we tell stories seen from Chef Marcus Samuelsson‘s point of view. MarcusSamuelsson.com strives to create conversations about food, nutrition, culture, art, and design. We want to find Read More

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