Breakfast

By MarcusSamuelsson.com | July 12, 2012


These delectable waffles have been eaten—and adored—by culinary icons like James Beard, MFK Fisher, and Ruth Reichl. Marion Cunningham, cookbook author and home cooking advocate first found the recipe once revising the Fannie Farmer Cookbook in the 1970s, and they’ve been loved by foodies ever since. No strange add-ins or toppings: just classic, crispy, fluffy waffles. So heat up your iron! If you aren’t a sit down breakfast person,  you’re about to become one. Read more about her legacy in our tribute to her- Head of the Table: Remembering Marion Cunningham.

Photo: TheCulinaryGeek

Marion Cunningham’s Raised Waffles Recipe

Servings: 4
Calories: 520 per serving
Prep Time: 8 hours, 15 minutes
Cook Time: 4 minutes
Total Time: 8 hours, 19 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • 1 package dry yeast
  • 2 cups warm milk
  • 1/2 cup melted butter (1 stick)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda

Directions

1. Use a rather large mixing bowl—the batter will rise to double its original volume. Put the water in the mixing bowl and sprinkle in the yeast. Let stand to dissolve for 5 minutes. Add the milk, butter, salt, sugar, and flour to the yeast mixture and beat until smooth and blended. (I often use a hand rotary beater to get rid of the lumps.) Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let stand overnight at room temperature.

2. Just before cooking the waffles, beat in the eggs, add the baking soda, and stir until well mixed. The batter will be very thin. Pour about 1/2 to 3/4 cup batter into a very hot waffle iron. Bake the waffles until they are golden and crisp. This batter will keep well for several days in the refrigerator.

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