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How to Build an Ethnic Pantry: Chinese

By Justin Chan | July 5, 2012

Photo: Jan Zeschky

Photo: Jan Zeschky

Chinese cuisine has become a huge part of American culture. Nearly every city and town across the country has a restaurant dedicated to serving Chinese food, and it seems as if the average American can’t get enough of it. In fact, Chinese food has become so popular that many non-Chinese have tried to imitate it, but few have successfully replicated it. Chinese chefs often stress that preparation is key, but what may be even more important is the selection of ingredients. Read More

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Chinese Supermarket Chain in Legal Trouble Over Sale of Live Animals

By Jeannette | April 2, 2012

Photo: dcmaster

Photo: dcmaster

By: Justin Chan

A debate over the sale of live animals in Virginia has turned into an issue over whether authorities are targeting Asian food businesses.

According to the Washington Post, a court in Fairfax County will decide whether managers of the popular Chinese supermarket chain, Great Wall Supermarket, violated a law that protects native species and criminalizes those who poach wild animals for meat, pelts and antlers. Great Wall operates across the country and has regularly sold live seafood, but a tw0-month undercover sting has put the grocery chain in trouble with the law. Those who have sided with the law, including conservationists and animal rights activists, have argued that the Virginia’s wildlife needs to be protected from becoming endangered. Read More

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Eating For Under $10 in Flushing

By admin | March 23, 2012

Photo: numbphoto

Photo: numbphoto

By: Cyndi Amaya

You know that craving you sometimes get for authentic Chinese food? Not the greasy-house-special-fried-rice-and-duck-sauce-stuff, but the real food that if you live in NYC would have to trek all the way down to Chinatown for. You know the kind I’m talking about- those perfectly pan-fried dumplings, the warm steamed pork buns, and the meticulously-cooked Peking Duck hanging from the window of a restaurant that’s been in the neighborhood for years. Well luckily for me, I don’t have to trek to Chinatown for it, and living in Queens, I don’t even have to trek to Manhattan for it. Queens has its own special Chinatown, or should I say Asiatown, in the city of Flushing and as luck would have it, I live in the next town over.

I say Asiatown because Flushing not only has a concentration of Chinese shops, restaurants, and other establishments, but it also houses numerous (and I mean numerous) Korean, Japanese, Thai, and Vietnamese businesses as well. It’s totally worth a trip over to Flushing because when you do arrive, it’s like you walk into the downtown section of an East Asian country- the language on signs change to characters and vendor after vendor sell a different variety of exotic foods and goods. Read More

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Street Food Focus: Chinese Eggettes

By Jeannette | March 2, 2012

Photo: corvuslee

Photo: corvuslee

By: Justin Chan

As a child, I often followed my mother around Chinatown. Though we lived in Queens, she insisted on buying her grocery from Chinese supermarkets. After all, they were the only ones in the city that carried the ingredients she needed to cook up a sizzling Chinese dish.

Oftentimes, she would spend an hour or so scanning and choosing products that were stocked neatly on the shelves. She treated her errand as if her life depended on it, while I had little interest. In fact, I would complain until she bought me Chinese eggettes from the street vendors that lined up along Canal Street. The bite-sized edibles were a cheap drug to shut me up. My mother knew I was addicted to them, and since they only costed a dollar, she found a cheap way to keep me quiet while she shopped for groceries. Read More

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Food Focus: Dim Sum

By Jeannette | February 10, 2012

Photo: Stefan Lins

Photo: Stefan Lins

By: Justin Chan

Chinese cuisine in America is often defined by typical dishes such as orange chicken, dumplings and chow mein. Those dishes only represent a small portion of the vast number of culinary treats the Chinese have to offer. Stroll through Chinatown in the vibrant Lower East Side, and you’ll find roasted pork or duck hanging in front of restaurant windows and vendors selling mini pancakes made from a gooey batter. Better yet, walk into a restaurant, and you might have the chance to experience a popular Cantonese serving known as dim sum.

Dim sum traces its roots back to the ancient Silk Road, which connected East Asia to parts of Africa and Europe. The trade route allowed merchants to exchange goods but also gave rise to a delicacy that many Chinese families have come to adore. Farmers and laborers would stop by teahouses along the route where they would yum cha (drink tea) and help themselves to dim sum or small platters of food. The Cantonese in Southern China particularly took a liking to the bite-sized edibles, and what used to be a quiet dining experience quickly became a raucous one. Read More

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Weekly Dish Recommendation: Satay Chicken at New Malaysia (New York)

By mahir | November 23, 2010

While you may be accustomed to more “mainstream” Asian cuisines such as Chinese and Japanese varieties, you are missing out if you have yet to try Malaysian food.  The interesting flavors combine the spices and aromas of Thailand and India.  Imagine savory curries, bold chilies, and spicy fried rice dishes.  New Malaysia is a particularly authentic destination located down a hidden alleyway in Chinatown, known as the Bowery Arcade.  Their Satay Chicken skewers are some of the best around.  Besides the meat being tender, each strip of chicken has been rolled in crushed peanuts.  This adds an extra layer of texture beyond just a simple coating of sweet peanut sauce.  It is definitely worth the long stroll from the closest subway to enjoy one of these fun appetizers.  The Chicken Satay makes a fabulous snack or an introduction to a savory cuisine.

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Whether it’s finding the best goat tacos in LA, spotting a well-worn vintage bag in Sweden, or interviewing the “crab man” selling seafood on a corner in Harlem, we tell stories seen from Chef Marcus Samuelsson‘s point of view. MarcusSamuelsson.com strives to create conversations about food, nutrition, culture, art, and design. We want to find Read More

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