dylan rodgers

What To Eat And Drink

Take Time to Smell the Rosé

By Dylan Rodgers | May 24, 2012

Photo: Evil Yoda

Photo: Evil Yoda

When thinking wine, the big question always seems to be “Red or White?”  Before you just blurt out a response in reflex, assess the situation.  What time of year is it?  Are you eating or just drinking?  If eating, what food are you in the mood for?

The answer to each of these questions gets you a little closer to the perfect wine for your situation, but there is a way to supersede the inquiry all together:  simply ask for a rosé.

The stigma about rosé as a spring and summer wine is purely dogmatic winery. Description: http://stg.marcuspopfood.com/wp-includes/js/tinymce/plugins/wordpress/img/trans.gif‘Connoisseurs’ that suggest this seasonal restriction have probably never tasted a good rosé during the winter for fear of breaking the ‘rules’ of wine that have no more to do with wine than manners have to the taste of the food.

The rosé is by far the most versatile wine on the market.  Read More

News

Quit Buggin’ Out: Eating Insects and its Cultural Phobia

By admin | May 8, 2012

Photo: Adam Schneider

Photo: Adam Schneider

By: Dylan Rodgers

Why are some of the world’s oldest organisms considered so alien?  Strangely enough once that crab (an arthropod) walks out of the water and transforms into let’s say, a beetle (still an arthropod), our appetite jumps ship.  We could also ask ourselves as Americans, Why hasn’t the insect-eating world gotten sick or turned into some horrifying “Anthropod” population?

The fact is, all people in the world consume insects whether they know about it or not.  It’s estimated that every American eats nearly 3 pounds of insects a year from processed foods alone.

Now don’t panic-if the insects haven’t killed you yet, then they most likely won’t.   Read More

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The Bare Bones of It: Vitamins, Immunity, and the American Health Care System

By admin | April 3, 2012

Photo: Wellcome Images

Photo: Wellcome Images

By: Dylan Rodgers

“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” was advice I heard often while growing up.  In 2009, it was estimated that an average of $8,000 was spent on every American in health costs, and considering the population at the time, almost 2.5 trillion dollars were spent fixing our broken health.  This got me thinking-I wonder how much our medical bill would have been in an America where preventative care was our top priority.  I’m not really talking about wearing helmets to walk around the city, though that may not be a bad idea.  I’m talking about your IBDS (Internal Biological Defense Systems).

On February 22 of this year, Science Daily reported on the importance of micronutrients (i.e. small doses of vitamins and minerals) in prenatal nutrition.  Put simply, micronutrient levels determine how a well a person develops.  The study found that vitamin supplements during pregnancy had astonishing effects on the newcomer’s immune system.

“Wait a second!” you’re probably thinking to yourself, “Didn’t you, Mr. Rodgers, write on the proven incompetence of religious vitamin consumption?”

The truth is-I now realize that the study in Minnesota was flawed.  Thirty-nine thousand women took vitamins by the handfuls without proper nutritional knowledge (as most people do).  Assuming you’ll absorb 100% of your daily dose of vitamins A, D, E, and K by taking a synthetic, pressed pill is just bad chemistry.  The results showed how damaging vitamins can be if taken incorrectly; maybe more so, the results showed how people can just as easily kill themselves with nutrition as they can with cigarettes. Read More

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Life Feeds on Life: The Consideration of the Jain Diet

By admin | February 15, 2012

Photo: Andre Mellagi

Photo: Andre Mellagi

By: Dylan Rodgers

Cries of impending doom rose from the soil…  These are the cries of the carrots.

                                                                            -Maynard James Keenan

Vegetarianism and veganism are drastically different with plenty of sub-sects of varying intensity. Many vegetarians outwardly concerned with the harm caused in animal slaughter argue that fish may or may not be excluded from their concern (probably the lack of eyelids) and the fact that plants don’t have a face.  With so many schools of thought, where exactly would you draw the line-that is if you find yourself considering such a life changing pursuit?

Consider this: scientifically plants, animals, fungi, bacteria, and viruses are all legitimate forms of life.  One key element to the definition of life is its response to external stimuli; it reacts when poked.  So this suggests that plants and all other life feel in one way or another.  The question arises:  if compassion is the driving force behind your choice, then how deep does this rabbit hole of passivism go?

Jainism, or the Jain Religion, is an order of nonviolent individuals bent on causing the least amount of harm possible, and their motto is not taken lightly.  Jains believe in the equality of souls and that all forms of life contain them. Read More

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The Science of Meat Tenderness and Color: The Untold Ben Franklin Story

By admin | January 25, 2012

Photo: IwateBuddy

Photo: IwateBuddy

By: Dylan Rodgers

My fiance and I just opened one room in our apartment to a European couple to give them shelter as they looked for residence here in NYC.  As I gave them the neighborhood tour, ultimately stopping at the food market, they asked me a question I guess I have always just taken for granted:  “Why is your beef in America so red?  Ours has more of a blue-grey hue.”

The question at first caught me off guard and I thought, “Well surely American beef companies dye their meat to make it more appealing.”  I decided to do a bit of research into the subject and surprisingly landed on a shocking experiment conducted by Benjamin Franklin.

We have all heard the story about Ben Franklin flying a kite with a key attached to it, thereby unraveling the mystery of lightening in 1752.  Well I’m here to tell you about another story; one that happened three years before and altered the world of food forever. Read More

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An American Foodie in London: Mushy Peas and Early Drinking

By admin | January 12, 2012

Photo: avlxyz

Photo: avlxyz

By: Dylan Rodgers

For Christmas 2011, I went British for a week.  Great Britain-the birthplace super broccoli and the people who would eventually lay the foundation for our country seemed so familiar and yet so inherently different at the same time.

To start, I sat in the front passenger seat of our cab disoriented and tense with oncoming traffic passing to the car’s right.  Throughout my week in London, I never really grew comfortable with the backwards nature of traffic.  Even while walking, the pedestrians want to pass you to your right, something that can lead to plenty of awkward dances with confused locals. Read More

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Illogical Economics: Inefficiency in Food Production Causes Problems

By admin | December 21, 2011

Photo: Or Resef

Photo: Or Resef

By: Dylan Rodgers

The relationship between Supply and Demand constitutes the simplest economic model.  But economics is far from simple; the complex web that connects each and every commodity and its prospective value makes the Supply and Demand model an unbelievably multifaceted system.  So when we wonder why food prices have skyrocketed by nearly 300 percent in some areas in the world, there is no one answer to this growing problem.

We’ll start with the good news-food prices are expected to continue to drop as they have over the last few months.  Some predict it will bottom out, a result bad for investors and good for hungry families.  This reprieve may be enough for struggling countries to begin to get back on our feet at least in terms of feeding ourselves.  But what about the future?  How can we as the World’s economy levee against a future flood of skyrocketing food prices? Read More

News

Salty Consequences: Americans Consuming Far Too Much Salt

By Dylan Rodgers | December 6, 2011

Photo: Tattooed Tentacle

Pop quiz:  What is the one ingredient to most any food that everyone worldwide can agree is necessary?  I’ll give you a hint-it’s the 6th most abundant compound on Earth.  Still perplexed?  Here’s another-it begins with an “S” and ends in “alt”.

Salt makes everything taste better; it preserves foods; it’s essential for normal bodily functions.  There’s only one problem:  humans consume way, way too much of it.  In fact, according to a CDC report, Americans consume almost 90 percent more sodium than the body actually needs and at least twice as much as the highest recommended level. Read More

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A Glass Half Full: How Rising Gas Prices Contribute to Fresher Foods

By admin | November 17, 2011

Photo: Urban Sea Star

Photo: Urban Sea Star

By: Dylan Rodgers

I like it when gas prices are high-not because my lungs often fill with hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxide every time I take a breath, nor am I vindictive toward impatient drivers and their incessant honking, causing everyone (except them of course) to wear hearing aids at age 40.  The main reason that I pray for gas prices to continue skyward is because it forces us to consider other options of living.

If massive planetary hostility from rising temperatures and childhood lung illnesses aren’t enough to push us towards greener living, then the only way it will happen is if we simply can’t afford to continue on this sinking oil rig we call life.  But as much as it may sound like it, I am not trying to preach or mount an offensive against “Big Oil” or anything.  I really just wanted to focus on the farmer’s market movement. Read More

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Flooding in South East Asia Will Reduce the World’s Rice Supply

By admin | November 4, 2011

Photo: Mark Robertson

Photo: Mark Robertson

By: Dylan Rodgers

One of the most influential foods in human history is also one of the smallest: rice.  Due to recent flooding in South East Asia their most important economic and nutritional element is threatened.  An estimated 12.5 percent of farmland in Thailand has been damaged, along with 6 percent in the Philippines, 12 percent in Cambodia, and 7.5 percent in Laos.

To put these numbers into perspective, in 2007 Thailand produced some 30 million tons of rice.  If they were going to harvest roughly the same amount this year, they will have possibly lost 3,360,000 tons of rice.  That is a huge number considering the average person eats roughly 300 pounds of rice a year.

But for these countries, this isn’t simply a food shortage; it’s a huge economic loss as well.  Read More

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