fishing

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To Fish or To Mine?: Saving Bristol Bay and Alaska’s Fishing Industry

By admin | March 8, 2012

Photo: FishPhotog

Photo: FishPhotog

By: Michael Engle

Alaska is the site of an ongoing political battle, between two opposing interest groups, that will shape the state, national, and world economy for generations.  Its legacy will be profound, as this economic decision will determine Alaska’s course in fishing or mining.

Bristol Bay lies northwest of the Aleutian Mountain Range; it is separated from the Gulf of Alaska by the Alaska Peninsula.  It is, currently, Alaska’s most vital fishing ground, as it houses rainbow trout and five distinct varieties of salmon.  Fishing in Bristol Bay has been identified as an important economic activity, accounting for 75% of local jobs, and $175 million per year to the economy.  It is the center of a cultural tradition, as 2009 marked the 125th anniversary of local fishing.  Bristol Bay also carries great international importance.  In 2008, National Geographic identified Bristol Bay as one of only three “well-maintained” fisheries in the world.  The other two are located in Iceland and New Zealand.

On the other hand, the Bristol Bay network is also home to large reserves of presently unmined natural resources.  There is gold and copper within the Kvichak and Nushagak Rivers, which both flow into Bristol Bay.  Read More

News

Harvesting The Florida Stone Crab: Animal Cruelty or Ecological Ingenuity?

By admin | March 2, 2012

Photo:  Andrea Westmoreland

Photo: Andrea Westmoreland

By: Michael Engle

Sustainable seafood” generally refers to the ideals of respecting certain seasons, not taking too many fish out of the sea at one time, and/or determining minimum and maximum sizes of legal catch.  Normally, when an animal is killed or fished, its culinary yield is limited to a resulting number of meat portions, plus a batch of stock made by boiling the leftover bones.  What if, almost like a perennial flower, the same individual animal could be fished repeatedly for food?  Not only does this concept exist in real life, but it is a culinary tradition in Miami Beach, FL.

The Florida stone crab is one of the most unique regional foods in the USA.  Unlike the Delaware blue crab, there is almost no meat in the stone crabs’ bodies.  To compensate for their meatless bodies, the stone crabs’ claws, which, in the wild, are strong enough to crush an oyster’s shell, are prized as delicacies.  Read More

News

Sustainable Fish Swimming Mainstream To Large Supermarkets

By admin | January 27, 2012

Photo: FrenchDuck

Photo: FrenchDuck

By: Saira Malhotra

Fish has been a hot topic for many food activists, environmentalists, restaurateurs and even many households in recent years. With an increase in fish consumption, no longer just being reserved to a restaurant experience, the question of sustainability is thrown in to light.

We wanted fish and we were able to buy it as expensively or inexpensively as we wanted. There was little understanding of where it came from; unless of course we associated quality with a buzz word location that prefaced it – Is this sea bass Chilean? Did this Salmon swim the crisp fresh waters of Norway?  Then something changed. The integrity by which the fish was raised came into question.  We became aware of varying harvesting techniques and we understood that it was not ‘all the same’. We were told that certain fish were becoming endangered and then that conversation led to an entire list of them. Read More

News

Fishy Business: Factory Fish Farms Not Going Anywhere

By admin | November 16, 2011

Photo: Thomas Quine

Photo: Thomas Quine

By: Saira Malhotra

According to Civil Eats, it appears that greed has thrown us under the bus yet again. We have allowed our land to be ravaged by our insatiable demands for more chicken, beef, pork and we are consciously paying the price. With ‘factory farming’ becoming part of our household diction, not only does it apply to chicken farms and milking parlors – milking it for more than it is worth, but it also now applies to fish. Read More

News

A Look Into Ethical Fish Choices

By admin | September 26, 2011

Photo: garryknight

Photo: garryknight

By: Ashley Bode

Twenty years has passed and we are still facing the same issues on our plates. In the 1980s consumers boycotted for dolphin-safe fishing and were promised an improvement. Yet, the general public is still unaware of how, where, and at what cost their seafood is caught. Is it time for us to think of fish as animals and not just a category of food?

According to Mark Bittman, Greenpeace is at it again, boycotting canned tuna in efforts to raise awareness and stop fishing done by long-lines and fish aggregating devices (devices that lure big fish, then detect and communicate how many fish are present); Read More

News

Changes for Shrimp Fishing Regulations in Maine

By admin | August 16, 2011

Photo: IllinoisHorseSoldier

Photo: IllinoisHorseSoldier

It looks like there could be some changes coming for Maine’s shrimping industry. According to a recent article in the Huffington Post, strains on the area’s shrimp fisheries over the last few years are causing regulators to consider new rules to limit shrimp fishing in Maine. Read More

News

Contributor Section

By mahir | August 25, 2010

I really appreciate you all tuning in and reading about my food experiences, and now I’d really like to hear yours. I’m starting a contributor section on MarcusSamuelsson.com where I want you to share your food stories and photos.

Become our local guide in your area of the world. We’re especially eager to hear stories and see personal photos related to fishing, hunting, pasta making, holiday meals and family traditions from around the world. And if you have a good cocktail, feel free to share that too!

If you have some good tidbits you’d like to see on my site, email us at foodtales@samuelssongroup.com
Looking forward to hearing from you!

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