food politics

Food PoliticsNews

Healthy Junk Food: Could the Cause be the Cure?

By Ashley Beck | July 31, 2013

burger
Photo: Terry Bain

Photo: Terry Bain

David H. Freedman, writer for The Atlantic, seems to believe it is the most plausible answer. When I first laid eyes on his article,  “How Junk Food Can End Obesity” , I was intrigued if not completely skeptical and even a bit scared (Especially since I was right in the middle of reading Michael Pollan’s In Defense of Food). Fast food chains and processed foods are what got us here in the first place. It’s not real food. It’s filled to the bliss point, with the Big 3 (Sugar, Salt, Fat). Why would we look to them to undo our unhealthy habits? Read More

Food Politics

Food Composting, Coming to NYC

By Christopher Stewart | July 23, 2013

Photo: kristyhall
recycle, food compost, NYC, food, waste

Photo: E.

Out of all the wonderful things NYC is known for, recycling is not one of them. In recycling programs, NYC falls behind 15% in the recycling rate, and Mayor Bloomberg along with Ron Gonen, New York Deputy Commissioner for recycling and sustainability are on a mission to put NYC in the forefront. Featured on The Salt: NPR food blog, a new food compost recycling program has begun in NYC. Read More

Food PoliticsWhere To GoWho To Know

Fighting for Red Hook’s Food Vendors: An Interview with Cesar Fuentes

By Justin Chan | July 12, 2012

Red Hook Food Vendor

Red Hook street vendor

Although Hispanics constitute the smallest demographic in Brooklyn’s Red Hook, one area of the neighborhood has been home to a significant number of Latin American food vendors. Since 1974, these vendors have served athletes and pedestrians who gather at the Red Hook Ball Fields, earning the vendors the nickname, “Ballfield Vendors.” Read More

Food StoriesWho To Know

Kids Yield Crops: In the Garden with Harlem Grown

By Emma Laperruque | July 12, 2012

Harlem Success Garden

Harlem Success Garden

Only two years ago, the lot across the street from P.S. 175 in Harlem was desolate: an abandoned community garden overflowing with trash, rats, and weeds. Thanks largely to the elementary school students next door, the space is a garden once more as it overflows with everything from cucumbers and melons to birds and worms, not to mention a ton of fresh basil.

The restoration all started with Tony Hillery, a man who originally came to P.S. 175 to assist the school’s parent coordinator. After spending some time in the area, though, Hillery had a revelation. Walking around the neighborhood, he counted 53 fried chicken restaurants within a three-block radius, and he began to think about the community’s access to nutritious food.

“You have pizza, fried chicken, fried fish, fried everything. I couldn’t get a healthy meal,” he said. “It was an epiphany. I said to myself: Why not do something?” Read More

Food PoliticsNews

The Dirt in Your Food May Actually Save Your Life

By Justin Chan | July 10, 2012

Photo: Ari Moore

New plants

In a city where skyscrapers and massive buildings outnumber arable land, community gardens are hard to come by. Those that are fortunate to plant a few crops in their backyards rarely do so, leaving millions of residents scoping for processed food at their local supermarkets. Some products contain chemicals that the average consumer has little knowledge of and they may do more harm than good. Read More

About Last NightFood Politics

Mother Jones Asks: What’s In Your Food?

By Marcus Samuelsson | June 8, 2012

MS at Mother Jones

Tom Philpott, Karen Washington, Marcus, Tamar Adler, Carolyn Mugar

Last night I participated in a food panel with Mother Jones magazine. The topic was simply “What’s In Your Food?” and my esteemed fellow conversationalists and I discussed how the food we eat plays a critical role in our lives and in politics. From Big Ag to pink slime and food deserts to the possible ban on large servings of soda, we shared our thoughts on what we think can be done to change the way we eat.

Mother Jones publisher Steve Katz opened the floor with an examination of the word, economics. Coming from the Ancient Greek word meaning “management of a household” it got us thinking about how money affects the way we eat—but it shouldn’t.  Read More

Food Politics

Governor Cuomo Ends Food Stamp Fingerprinting

By Allana Mortell | May 31, 2012

Photo: Bram Cymet

Photo: Bram Cymet

Until last week, those individuals looking to receive food stamps had to endure a very critical, degrading and frustrating fingerprinting process that has been heavily criticized by policy officials, political figures and most recently, Governor Andrew Cuomo. The past few months have seen various verbal altercations between Cuomo and City Mayor Bloomberg, who argues for the process of fingerprinting, saying how the process limits fraud. Cuomo, on the other hand has been quoted saying, “We shouldn’t treat the poor or hungry as criminals.” One of the biggest factors in Cuomo’s decision to alleviate fingerprinting altogether has to do with the efforts towards ending childhood hunger. Since almost half of all food stamp beneficiaries are children, boosting the number of eligible families who are able to receive food stamps would be an effective way to end the worldwide problem. Read More

Food Politics

The Meat of the Matter

By Diana Tsuchida | May 24, 2012

Photo: Ryan Morrison

Photo: Ryan Morrison

A few weeks back, the NY Times launched an essay contest for readers to answer the contentious philosophical question that puts many food-enthusiasts on edge: is meat-eating ethical? In a social moment of heightened vegetarian, vegan and global warming awareness that have lunged the topic of meat and overall food consumption into the limelight, a few highlights worthy of consideration stood out among the passionate responses.  Considering the current flooding of health-initiatives, complex diets and a focus on farm to table politics, the contest highlighted the sometimes-contradictory and always opinionated debate on the ethics of meat-eating.

One woman who grew up on a farm discusses the most basic levels of interconnection between crops, animals and humans–one that relies on animals to graze the fields upon which they naturally fertilize and that people need to consume to keep in step with a natural order. She stresses the fact that a balanced and healthy life is one in which we should not dismiss part of this self-sustaining cycle where animals need to be eaten, if not for any other reason than to make room on an increasingly crowded planet.  Read More

News

Making Waves in the Community: Michel Nischan and Wholesome Wave

By Marcus Samuelsson | May 1, 2012

Photo: Cyndi Amaya

Photo: Cyndi Amaya

Michel Nischan never seizes to amaze me. He is a man of many sorts – an award-winning cookbook author, famed chef of Dressing Room in Westport, CT and a fellow advocate for local and sustainable eating. His passion for food began at an early age but his pioneering efforts towards healthful eating arose when his son Chris was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. In dealing with his son’s health and looking for new initiatives in local food systems, Nischan’s outlook on food was altered. “Food as a single subject has more of an impact on human health, societal health, environmental health and economic health than any other single subject,” he said.

So I was pleased to see that NPR recently featured Michel and brought attention to his non-profit, Wholesome Wave, that connects low-income neighborhoods with fresh food straight from the local farmers. Read More

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About The Team

Whether it’s finding the best goat tacos in LA, spotting a well-worn vintage bag in Sweden, or interviewing the “crab man” selling seafood on a corner in Harlem, we tell stories seen from Chef Marcus Samuelsson‘s point of view. MarcusSamuelsson.com strives to create conversations about food, nutrition, culture, art, and design. We want to find Read More

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