harlem week

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Renowned Harlem Week Begins This Weekend

By Allana Mortell | July 25, 2012

Photo: Monika Sziladi

Photo: Monika Sziladi

This coming Saturday, July 28th kicks off a month-long celebration of all things Harlem. Since 1974, millions have flocked to 125th street and beyond to commemorate the past, present and future of the historical Harlem neighborhood we call home. What started as “Harlem Day,” turned into Harlem Week and eventually Harlem Month. Now in its 38th year, people of all ages are invited to take part in over 100 different events over the span of four weeks. Whether arts & crafts are your thing or free concerts, food, jazz festivals and even gospel choirs, Harlem Week has it all and we couldn’t be more excited to participate. Read More

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The George Washington Bridge: Suspension Sandwich

By admin | August 31, 2011

Photo: Hialean

Photo: Hialean

By: Dylan Rodgers

Over 600 feet tall and lit up like Vegas at night, the George Washington Bridge stands as a marvel to modern engineering.  It spans a distance of 4,760 ft. across the Hudson River and connects Washington Heights in Harlem, NY to Fort Lee, New Jersey.  The length is not what makes this bridge remarkable.  Read More

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The Little Red Lighthouse: A Children’s Lesson to Adults

By admin | August 30, 2011

Photo: David Bledsoe

Photo: David Bledsoe

By: Dylan Rodgers

There’s an old saying, “Every time a child cries, a lighthouse gets its wings.” … or something to that effect.   O.K., maybe that’s not an old saying, or any saying for that matter, but in the case of one red lighthouse, it’s entirely true.

Have you ever read The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge, by Hildegarde H. Swift?  Long story short:  It is about the construction of the 604 ft. Washington Bridge next to the 40 ft. lighthouse.  Before the Washington Bridge was built, the Little Red Lighthouse was the only protection ships had from the jagged rocks as they navigated the narrow Hudson River pass between Harlem and Fort Lee, New Jersey. Read More

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Rucker Park: A Basketball Player’s Dream

By admin | August 26, 2011

Photo: Evoke

Photo: Evoke

By: Dylan Rodgers

Written in the history books of legendary venues, Holcombe Rucker Memorial Park is second to none when it comes to street-ball.  No other public basketball court has been so influential in the sport; a Mecca for basketball legends both locally and internationally famed.  Holcombe Rucker, a New York City Parks Department worker, couldn’t have known that the P.S. 156 Playground he opened in 1956 would later have NBA stars eager to put their names on the list of those who have played at The Rucker Park. Read More

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The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

By admin | August 25, 2011

Photo: trini_map

Photo: trini_map

By: Dylan Rodgers

Located at 515 Malcolm X Boulevard in Harlem, the Schomburg Center for Research is a national library focusing solely on the history and experiences of peoples of African descent throughout the world.  A research unit of The New York Public Library, the Schomburg Center is globally recognized as one of the leading institutions of its kind. Read More

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Duke Ellington: Inventor of American Music

By admin | August 24, 2011

Photo: Alex Mcchesney

Photo: Alex Mcchesney

By: Dylan Rodgers

Next to a miniature concert grand piano, Duke Ellington stands immortalized in bronze in Frawley Circle.  This monument was the first in New York City to be built in honor of an African-American.  It was built in 1997 in a semi-circular plaza at the gateway to Harlem on 5th Avenue and 110th Street.  Towering above the public in Harlem, the place where he transformed the face of American music, Duke and his piano are supported by nine caryatid figures holding the immense weight of his legendary prowess. Read More

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The City College of New York

By admin | August 22, 2011

Photo: Dave Bledsoe

Photo: Dave Bledsoe

By: Dylan Rodgers

Standing castle-like in gothic splendor, the City College of New York (CCNY) was founded in 1847 and is the first college of The City University of New York (CUNY)’s 23 divisions.  It was established as a combination between a prep school and a college that provided free, higher education for children of immigrants and poor families. Read More

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Featured Recipe

Image by Rod Waddington Dinner

By Suzannah Schneider

Injera

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Meet the Team

About The Team

Whether it’s finding the best goat tacos in LA, spotting a well-worn vintage bag in Sweden, or interviewing the “crab man” selling seafood on a corner in Harlem, we tell stories seen from Chef Marcus Samuelsson‘s point of view. MarcusSamuelsson.com strives to create conversations about food, nutrition, culture, art, and design. We want to find Read More

Restaurants

Red Rooster Harlem
Ginny’s Supper Club
Uptown Brasserie
American Table Cafe and Bar
Kitchen and Table
American Table Brasserie and Bar
Norda
Marc Burger