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The Good Eats at Smorgasburg: Umame Nuts

By Diana Tsuchida | September 24, 2013

Umame Nuts

Umame Nuts

Taking seaweed to elevated heights from its association as wrapping for sushi or a simple salad is no easy feat. But Li Liang has embraced the sensory power of this ocean greenery. He is the owner and creative force behind Umame Nuts, a name he’s coined for a healthy snack inspired by Shanghainese and Taiwanese street food. Each Umame Nuts blend is a textural experience, as they are blended with tai cai seaweed, organic brown rice crisps, tapioca syrup and a small amount of cane sugar. The umami, or fifth taste (other than sweet, sour, bitter, salt), naturally occurs in the seaweed. Natural glutamates creates the savory note in Umame Nuts. No MSG and absolutely nothing artificial is found in the recipe. The company has already garnered recognition and acclaim, having won the grand prize at the Entrepreneur Challenge & Competition, a prestigious platform that showcases Taiwanese American entrepreneurs who are engaging and inspiring the community. Read More

RecipesTips

No Cook Recipe: Chilled Soups

By Alexandra Fleischman | July 24, 2013

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We think of soup as a comforting, heartwarming, cold-weather food, but in the hottest days of summer, chilled soups are flavorful and (thank goodness) hydrating. That’s not the only reason to make one, though. Some others: 1) Use up seasonal produce, 2) Impress guests with the brightly-colored flavorful concoctions, 3) Make dinner in ten minutes, and again, 4) Keep cool. Don’t be overwhelmed by your choices–if you’ve ever made a smoothie before, you can make a puréed soup. The oil, texture, vegetables, and spices can separate this from anything you could pick up at a juice bar and enjoy with a spoon. Read More

Chasing Flavors

Leftover Lunch: Zucchini Two Ways

By Alexandra Fleischman | June 17, 2013

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2012-06-24_1340536422

After a weekend of unhealthy eating, I like to make Sunday lunches light. Think fresh vegetables, not many fats, and bright, sunny flavors. A raw zucchini salad was perfect for me this weekend. Dressed with olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, salt and pepper, and freshly ground parmesan cheese, the fresh zucchini and tomatoes shone.

With quite a bit of leftover shaved zucchini however, I was stuck. Already lightly salted and oiled, I couldn’t exactly throw them into a healthy chocolate zucchini muffin batter. Instead, I decided to whip up my lunch for Monday: fritelli di zucchini (an easy version of this recipe below).
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Farmer's Market

Swiss Chard, Five Ways

By Alexandra Fleischman | June 12, 2013

rainbow swiss chard, chard, farmers market, 125th street

The 125th Street Farmers Market opened this week , and I wasn’t about to miss it. On its first day of the summer season, the market was complete with fresh produce, baked goods, jars of applesauce and jams, and craft vendors. Located at 125th street on the Plaza of the Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. State Office Building, the market will be open Tuesdays from 10am-5pm and Fridays from 3-8pm.

This week, I picked up a bunch of Rainbow Swiss Chard from Migliorelli Farms. It’s located in Tivoli, New York, under 100 miles away from the city. Read More

Back to Basics

Back to Basics: Baby Bok Choy

By Kendall Kish | May 14, 2013

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Baby Bok Choy

Baby Bok Choy

Name: Brassica chinensis, bok choy in Cantonese means “white vegetable”, also known as Chinese Cabbage.

Origins: Chinese cabbage was studied for its medicinal qualities during the Ming Dynasty. The vegetable then spread to northern China before being introduced to Korea where it became a staple vegetable for making kimchi. Now commonly available in North America, Bok Choy is a staple ingredient in Asian cuisine.

Peak Season: Late winter to early summer. Read More

Health & WellnessRecipe Roundup

Healthier Homemade Versions of Your Favorite Chips and Dip

By Kendall Kish | May 9, 2013

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There’s nothing like a good dip to round out your appetizer table at your party. However, store-bought dips are often loaded with fat and calories, having mayonnaise and/or sour cream as the base. And the potato chips used to serve the dip are full of sodium and preservatives, leaving you with a calorie-laden appetizer that is just plain run-of-the-mill. Read More

Cookbooks

Off The Shelf: Salad for Dinner

By Christopher Stewart | April 22, 2013

Salad for Dinner
salad for dinner, fresh and healthy

Get fresh and light for dinner with this great cookbook.

I know some people are not fans of salad. Some believe it’s not a filling meal, others say it’s too healthy, and a few say it’s too expensive.  I don’t fit into any of these categories. I love eating fresh crisp salads whether it be for a light lunch or a satisfying dinner. Jeanne Kelley, food editor and author of  ”Salad for Dinner: Complete Meals for all Seasons”  has compiled a vibrant cookbook, dedicated to everything salad. Starting off, what do you need to enjoy a great salad… none of than fresh greens. With the first section in the book appropriately titled, “A Salad Primer”  you will learn the definition and origins of salad greens, herbs, and foraged greens like chickweed, dandelion greens and wood sorrel, and also what should accompany these lettuces. Read More

Back to Basics

Back to Basics: English Peas

By Kendall Kish | April 8, 2013

peas
peas

Photo: Kendall Kish

Name: The scientific name Pissum sativum refers to the pod that holds the pea, which is actually a seed.


Origins:
Peas were a staple in medieval cuisine, mainly used to make pea soup. The earliest known uses of peas were discovered in Syria, Turkey, and Jordan. More modern, green “garden” peas were found cultivated in Europe in the early 17th century. Read More

Back to Basics

Back to Basics: Artichokes

By Kendall Kish | March 18, 2013

Photo: Kendall Kish

Photo: Kendall Kish

Name: Artichoke; Cynara cardunculus. The word artichoke is derived from the Italian words articiocco and articoclos.

Origins: Believed to be one of the oldest vegetables in the world, the artichoke was first referenced as being cultivated in regions of Southern Europe around the Mediterranean in 300 B.C.

Nutritional Value:  Artichokes are high in vitamin C, magnesium, potassium, fiber, and folate. They also have significant levels of silymann, an antioxidant that targets the liver, gallbladder, and digestive tract.

Peak Season: March – May Read More

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Featured Recipe

Photo by Sudhamshu Sauces & Rubs

By Marcus Samuelsson

Awase

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Meet the Team

About The Team

Whether it’s finding the best goat tacos in LA, spotting a well-worn vintage bag in Sweden, or interviewing the “crab man” selling seafood on a corner in Harlem, we tell stories seen from Chef Marcus Samuelsson‘s point of view. MarcusSamuelsson.com strives to create conversations about food, nutrition, culture, art, and design. We want to find Read More

Restaurants

Red Rooster Harlem
Ginny’s Supper Club
Uptown Brasserie
American Table Cafe and Bar
Kitchen and Table
American Table Brasserie and Bar
Norda
Marc Burger