local

Farmer's Market

Celebrating Summer at the 125th Street Farmers’ Market

By Suzannah Schneider | August 11, 2014

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Plums and peaches

The 125th Street Farmers’ Market is one of the best places to be this time of year. The summer growing season peaks in late July into August, so the market is bursting with the vibrant colors and aromas of produce like tomatoes, peaches, eggplant, beans, plums, and corn. The market also features all kinds of treats including grass-fed meats, hard cider, free-range eggs, jewelry, natural body products, fresh breads, and informational tents for alternative energy sources. There’s also fantastic live music courtesy of Red Rooster Harlem, Ginny’s Supper Club, and Harlem Community Development Corporation.

There’s a whole lotta goodness in this slice of Harlem!

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Farmers’ markets are fantastic because they offer such unique produce. Sure, you can purchase your typical apples and carrots, but interesting plants like cranberry beans (above), green plums, or yellow string beans (below) are also available at a fair price.

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The 125th Street Farmers’ Market is a project of Governor Cuomo’s FreshConnect initiative to bring fresh food from New York farms to underserved communities throughout New York. Almost 1.5 million New Yorkers live in an area with limited grocery store access, also known as “food deserts.” FreshConnect aims to combat this problem through the “FreshConnect Checks” program. The project provides a $2 rebate check for every $5 in SNAP benefits (formerly known as “Food Stamps”) spent at the market. This means that everyone can have access to local, sustainably-grown, delicious food.

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What we love here at Marcus Samuelsson Group about farmers’ markets is how they connect us to nature. We live in New York City  surrounded by concrete instead of soil, skyscrapers instead of trees. Sometimes we forget there’s a whole natural world out there! Farmers’ markets connect us to the environment in a very tangible and delicious way. We’re reminded of how scrumptious seasonal produce can be.

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We hope to see you at the 125th Street Farmers’ Market on Tuesdays through November 25, 2104 from 10 am to 7 pm, rain or shine on the corner of 125th Street and Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Blvd.!

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CommunityHealth & Wellness

Gift Guide: Handmade Soap by DiPalermo Body

By Ashley Bode | December 12, 2013

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“Every year around this time, I get asked by fans, friends, restaurant-goers and publications what my go-to gifts are. This year, My team and I have decided to feature a few artisans who are making great products that are perfect for the holidays. Whether it is fancy soap for my mother or a really rad apron for one of my colleagues, or the flight of roof-top honey for the person who is impossible to shop for here are some essentials that could I know I will be giving this year. First up, Jessica Morelli from New York City.”- Marcus

 

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MS.com: What is the name of your company and what do you make?

Jessica Morelli: The name of my company is di Palermo Body.  I make artisan skin care made in small batches using only natural and organic ingredients. At a young age my Nona (grandmother) taught me how to garden, the importance of eating organic food and living a holistic lifestyle. ‘di Palermo’ means of Palermo, which is where she was from so di Palermo Body is in honor of her.

MS.com: How did you get started?

JM: Five years ago I bought a bar of natural soap at a small shop and fell in love.  I didn’t even know people still made soap from scratch.  I immediately was hooked and had to find out how I could make it myself.   Coming from a large Italian family I loved to cook.  I found that making soap was much like cooking, and creating a formula is just like creating a recipe, you just don’t eat the end product.

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MS.com : Where do you produce and sell it?

JM: I currently make all the products out of my 5th floor walk-up Manhattan apartment; tight quarters but organization is the key.  Etsy is my main online platform and because of it I’ve been able to sell  all over the world.  I have retailers in LA and Chicago and am hoping to find a few in New York that are a good fit in the coming months.

MS.com: Of all your collection, what is the best for a holiday gift?

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JM: Whether you give a bundle of 4 soaps for $25 for your sister, a sugar scrub for someone at the office for $12, or a single bar of soap as a stocking stuffer for only $7,  all of my products are within a price range that is perfect for gifts.

MS.com:  How do you see your audience changing over the past few years? Is there more an interest in artisan products and how do you see that growing?

JM: Over the five years I’ve been making natural products my market has always been people who understand the importance of using natural products for both their skin’s and the environment’s benefit. More and more people are finding the value in handcrafted goods, its nice to see people wanting so support small businesses.

MS.com Favorites:

Ristretto Sugar Scrub and Soap

This scent, coffee and lemon, is a natural deodorizer and works great in the kitchen eliminating the scents of cooking like garlic, onion or fish.

Conjure Soap

This scent, vanilla and vetiver, has a more masculine appeal to it and a great label. Men like fancy soap too!

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The Modern PantryWhat To Buy

The Modern Pantry: Tin Mustard

By Ashley Beck | June 11, 2013

Tin Dizdarevic, creator of Tin mustard

With a need for an accoutrement to a charcuterie board during service, Tin Dizdarevic, a Colicchio vet, quickly improvised and came up with this “caviar pop” grainy mustard. With simple, natural ingredients to back it up, the texture is really what makes this condiment shine in an array of dishes.

A great partner to its original mate, charcuterie, Tin Mustard is also great in vinaigrettes, on grilled meats or an all-American hot dog. Add it to this grilled sausage and pepper sandwich or a healthy and simple green salad with shake and pour vinaigrette (made) in a jar. They guarantee it’s so good, you can even eat it solo from the spoon. Let’s just say, Tin has taken The Mustard Revolution to a whole new level. Read More

RestaurantsWhere To Go

Colonie: Bruijkleen for Brunch

By Ashley Beck | May 17, 2013

Ramps two ways with crispy pork belly and heirloom grits
Brunch service at Colonie, Bruijkleen

Brunch service at Colonie, Bruijkleen

Named in honor of the Dutch who first came to Bruijkleen (Brooklyn), Colonie is a pioneer for the new food frontier in the Brooklyn Heights food scene. Since their opening in 2011, Colonie has been dishing out fresh, local ingredients in simple yet exquisite ways. Not to mention the décor, which when done by Public and Double Crown vets, Tamer Hamawi, Emelie Kihlstrom and Elise Rosenberg, you know it’s nothing short of perfection–from the rustic wood planked ceilings and living wall all the way down to the multi-purpose menu placemats. Read More

News

How To Eat Locally in the Winter

By Melaina Gasbarrino | December 5, 2011

Photo: Suzy Morris

Localism, a term many know as encouraging sustainability within their own communities, may seem like a hard feat during the winter months. Often times when we think of eating locally, we think of lush summer outdoor food markets and tend to motor on through the cold winter months buying fruits and vegetables from Down South or from across the pond.

But now, as the cold, weary winter season is approaching us, localism is one thing you may veer away from because you can’t seem to find anything that tickles your fancy in the fresh, local food department. Today is the day to shed all your winter worries, as these few facts will help you keep them concept of localism alive during the winter months. Read More

News

365 Days of Localism

By admin | September 30, 2011

Photo: Andy Castro

Photo: Andy Castro

By: Melaina Gasbarrino

Imagine a year without Target, Starbucks, Costco or Walmart. It might be a tough feat to beat but the Levitch Family of Scottsdale, Arizona, pledged they would buy local for a year. Localism, defined by the Merriam-Webster dictionary as “an affection or partiality for a particular place,” is all about buying, eating and shopping locally. It’s about ensuring the mom-and-pop shops in your town stay open. Read More

News

Farming on the Water

By admin | August 4, 2011

Photo: Arielle Solomon

 

Photo: Arielle Solomon

For a while, farm-to-table has been the hottest idea is cooking. But recently, some produce is getting even more local-it’s becoming garden-to-table. Read More

News

An Introduction to Food Buzz Words

By admin | July 11, 2011

Photo: cwwycoff1 on flickr

Photo: cwwycoff1 on flickr

In today’s culinary world, a lot of buzzwords get thrown around at super markets and on menus. Classifications like farm-fresh, organic, farm-to-table, and free-range sound appealing, but what do they really mean? Here’s an introduction to some of these terms to help you navigate food jargon. Read More

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Featured Recipe

Image by Rod Waddington Dinner

By Suzannah Schneider

Injera

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Meet the Team

About The Team

Whether it’s finding the best goat tacos in LA, spotting a well-worn vintage bag in Sweden, or interviewing the “crab man” selling seafood on a corner in Harlem, we tell stories seen from Chef Marcus Samuelsson‘s point of view. MarcusSamuelsson.com strives to create conversations about food, nutrition, culture, art, and design. We want to find Read More

Restaurants

Red Rooster Harlem
Ginny’s Supper Club
Uptown Brasserie
American Table Cafe and Bar
Kitchen and Table
American Table Brasserie and Bar
Norda
Marc Burger