new york city

Food Politics

Food Composting, Coming to NYC

By Christopher Stewart | July 23, 2013

Photo: kristyhall
recycle, food compost, NYC, food, waste

Photo: E.

Out of all the wonderful things NYC is known for, recycling is not one of them. In recycling programs, NYC falls behind 15% in the recycling rate, and Mayor Bloomberg along with Ron Gonen, New York Deputy Commissioner for recycling and sustainability are on a mission to put NYC in the forefront. Featured on The Salt: NPR food blog, a new food compost recycling program has begun in NYC. Read More

Travel

Wanderlust: Midsummer in Sweden

By Mac Malikowski | May 15, 2013

Midsummer_Sweden

The summer solstice occurs exactly when the axial tilt of a planet’s semi-axis in a given hemisphere is most inclined towards the star that it orbits…and if you haven’t brushed up on your astronomy recently, it’s also means it’s time to party. Midsummer is a celebration based on the summer solstice. In Sweden specifically, Midsummer is take place on the third weekend of June with the main festivities taking place on the Friday of that weekend (this year is looking like June 21st). Read More

Community

Must Visit: The National Dance Institute

By Kendall Kish and Christopher Stewart | April 29, 2013

NDI

“The arts open your heart and mind to possibilities that are limitless. They are pathways that touch upon our brains and emotions and bring sustenance to imagination. Human beings’ greatest form of communication, they walk in tandem with science and play, and best describe what it is to be human.”
-Jacques d’Amboise Read More

Q & AWho To Know

Catching up with Efva Attling

By Fanny Sturen | November 13, 2012

Efva Attling

Efva Attling

 Jewelry designer Efva Attling talks about her rejection from Abba, clubbing in the Meatpacking District in the 70′s, and how important your hairdresser can be.

Name: Efva Attling
Most of us know her because: She has her own jewelry brand with stores and retailers all over the world, EfvaAttling.com.
Lives: Alphabet City, New York and Södermalm, Stockholm.

Read More

Food Stories

Urban Farming: Brooklyn Grange Documentary

By Joseph Hernandez | September 25, 2012

brooklyn grange

Still from Brooklyn Grange: A Portrait of Urban Farming

The Brooklyn Grange, located in Queens, New York has long been known as the largest soil rooftop farm in the world. Serving as a CSA and providing produce to restaurants throughout the city, the farm is a roaring success after just two years. However back in May, the bustling urban farm continued its plans for expansion by signing a 20 year lease on a 65,000-square-foot rooftop at the once defunct Brooklyn Navy Yards. Read More

What To DoWhere To Go

Quick Bites of the Big Apple

By Diana Tsuchida | July 30, 2012

Lunch Hour NYC exhibit

Treat yourself to a midday break with a quick walk around Lunch Hour NYC at the public library, going on now through February 2013. The free interactive exhibit will satiate foodies and history buffs alike, leaving visitors to gawk nostalgically at the price of a slice of pizza in 1980 (it was 60 cents, by the way) while reading up on the fascinating traditions of peanut butter and how salads became a diet food. Check out pictures from the exhibit, including a recipe from New York’s first vending machines. Read More

Food PoliticsWhere To GoWho To Know

Fighting for Red Hook’s Food Vendors: An Interview with Cesar Fuentes

By Justin Chan | July 12, 2012

Red Hook Food Vendor

Red Hook street vendor

Although Hispanics constitute the smallest demographic in Brooklyn’s Red Hook, one area of the neighborhood has been home to a significant number of Latin American food vendors. Since 1974, these vendors have served athletes and pedestrians who gather at the Red Hook Ball Fields, earning the vendors the nickname, “Ballfield Vendors.” Read More

Food StoriesWho To Know

Kids Yield Crops: In the Garden with Harlem Grown

By Emma Laperruque | July 12, 2012

Harlem Success Garden

Harlem Success Garden

Only two years ago, the lot across the street from P.S. 175 in Harlem was desolate: an abandoned community garden overflowing with trash, rats, and weeds. Thanks largely to the elementary school students next door, the space is a garden once more as it overflows with everything from cucumbers and melons to birds and worms, not to mention a ton of fresh basil.

The restoration all started with Tony Hillery, a man who originally came to P.S. 175 to assist the school’s parent coordinator. After spending some time in the area, though, Hillery had a revelation. Walking around the neighborhood, he counted 53 fried chicken restaurants within a three-block radius, and he began to think about the community’s access to nutritious food.

“You have pizza, fried chicken, fried fish, fried everything. I couldn’t get a healthy meal,” he said. “It was an epiphany. I said to myself: Why not do something?” Read More

Food PoliticsNews

The Dirt in Your Food May Actually Save Your Life

By Justin Chan | July 10, 2012

Photo: Ari Moore

New plants

In a city where skyscrapers and massive buildings outnumber arable land, community gardens are hard to come by. Those that are fortunate to plant a few crops in their backyards rarely do so, leaving millions of residents scoping for processed food at their local supermarkets. Some products contain chemicals that the average consumer has little knowledge of and they may do more harm than good. Read More

Newsletter

Featured Recipe

Photo by Sudhamshu Sauces & Rubs

By Marcus Samuelsson

Awase

More Recipes

Meet the Team

About The Team

Whether it’s finding the best goat tacos in LA, spotting a well-worn vintage bag in Sweden, or interviewing the “crab man” selling seafood on a corner in Harlem, we tell stories seen from Chef Marcus Samuelsson‘s point of view. MarcusSamuelsson.com strives to create conversations about food, nutrition, culture, art, and design. We want to find Read More

Restaurants

Red Rooster Harlem
Ginny’s Supper Club
Uptown Brasserie
American Table Cafe and Bar
Kitchen and Table
American Table Brasserie and Bar
Norda
Marc Burger