Nico Vera

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A Brief History of Peruvian Cuisine in Five Courses – Part Five

By Nico Vera | September 21, 2012

ceviche-nikkei

In this five part series, Chef Nico Vera presents the rich culinary history of Peru through the lens of a five course meal. Follow along as he breaks down Peruvian flavors, transporting us to the land of Incas and beyond. Read Part OnePart TwoPart Three and Part Four

Even during the time of the Incas, the Inca King in Cuzco ate fresh seafood that was carried by Chasqui runners from the coast to the Andes mountains — a distance of over 200 miles on the Inca Trail. And while the Incas may have cooked fresh fish or sivichi in fruit juice, the Moorish dish seivech, of fish marinated in lemon juice, likely also contributed to the creation of ceviche. Read More

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A Brief History of Peruvian Cuisine in Five Courses – Part Four

By Nico Vera | September 20, 2012

lomo-saltado

In this five part series, Chef Nico Vera presents the rich culinary history of Peru through the lens of a five course meal. Follow along as he breaks down Peruvian flavors, transporting us to the land of Incas and beyond. Read Part OnePart Two and Part Three.

After Afro-Peruvian slaves won their freedom, there was a need for laborers in the farms and plantations of the coast of Peru, and this opportunity brought immigrants from the Canton region of China to Peru over 150 years ago. Immigrants brought with them spices such as ginger and soy sauce, and of course, the wok for cooking with these spices. Read More

RecipesTips

A Brief History of Peruvian Cuisine in Five Courses – Part Three

By Nico Vera | September 19, 2012

frejol-colado

In this five part series, Chef Nico Vera presents the rich culinary history of Peru through the lens of a five course meal. Follow along as he breaks down Peruvian flavors, transporting us to the land of Incas and beyond. Read Part One and Part Two.

The Spanish also brought African slaves to Peru, many of which worked in sugar plantations or as servants and cooks to the wealthy families in Lima. Despite the class difference, however, there was no denying that the Afro-Peruvians were true masters in the kitchen, and one of their many specialties was desserts. The desserts they created are hundreds of years old, and cooking them makes me feel like an alchemist, stirring ingredients over a low fire, as if a creating a medicinal potion that will lift even the lowest of spirits. Read More

Food StoriesRecipes

A Brief History of Peruvian Cuisine in Five Courses – Part Two

By Nico Vera | September 18, 2012

pisco-sour

In this five part series, Chef Nico Vera presents the rich culinary history of Peru through the lens of a five course meal. Follow along as he breaks down Peruvian flavors, transporting us to the land of Incas and beyond. Read Part One here. 

During the time of the Spanish Viceroyalty of Peru, Lima was known as “The City of The Kings,” and was a major port for trade between the Americas and Europe. It was this trade that introduced new produce to Peruvian soil such as onions, limes and grapes. At first, the grapes were grown to produce wine, but the wine from Peru was so well received that it was banned by the King of Spain lest it compete with wines from Spain. This forced the Viceroyalty of Peru to find another use for its vineyards in the Ica Valley, and in the late 1500‘s the wine was distilled to make Pisco. Read More

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Whether it’s finding the best goat tacos in LA, spotting a well-worn vintage bag in Sweden, or interviewing the “crab man” selling seafood on a corner in Harlem, we tell stories seen from Chef Marcus Samuelsson‘s point of view. MarcusSamuelsson.com strives to create conversations about food, nutrition, culture, art, and design. We want to find Read More

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