Marcus' BermudaRestaurants

Marcus’ in Bermuda Officially Opens May 27th!

By Becca Cory | April 18, 2015

On May 27th, I'll be opening my new restaurant, Marcus', in Bermuda.

On May 27th, I'll be opening my new restaurant, Marcus', in Bermuda.

Last week, I officially announced that my latest restaurant, Marcus’, will open on May 27th in Bermuda. The announcement was made in an exclusive with Travel + Leisure.

Marcus’ will focus Caribbean-inspired cuisine.The space is inside the newly renovated Bermuda Fairmont Hamilton Princess, and should be pretty spectacular against the island’s natural beauty.  Bermuda is one of my favorite places to visit – I’ve fallen in love with people and the culture there – so I’m really excited about this project.

To celebrate the opening of Marcus’, the Hamilton Princess is offering three special travel packages. All three packages include a two night stay at the Bermuda hotel, a five course meal with beverage pairings at the restaurant, and a signed copy of my latest book, Marcus Off Duty: The Recipes I Cook at Home, plus some other fun perks. You can find out more about these deals here on their website in the Food and Wine section.

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Swedish American Chamber of Commerce Green Summit: From Farm to Fork

By Raquel Jacquez | November 17, 2015

Photo of Gail Simmons, Marcus Samuelsson, Emma Bengtsson, Fredrik Berselius and Amanda Cohen at the Swedish American Chamber of Commerce Green Summit - from Farm to Fork.

Just last week Marcus was in conversation with other Swedish restauranteurs at the Swedish American Chamber of Commerce Green Summit – from Farm to Fork.  Growing up in Sweden, Marcus has profound memories eating fresh fish and local foods that were the backbone of his diet as a child. Growing up in that environment allowed him to nurture his curiosity for the world around him and discover the multitude of connections between the environment and his family’s kitchen. Today, as a chef and restauranteur, Marcus uses his knowledge and awareness of the webbed supply chain in order to elevate the conversation around sustainability.

As a chef, Marcus has devoted so much of his energies toward growing sustainable models inside his restaurants in order to support the local communities where his restaurants reside. Whether he is in Stockholm, Bermuda or Harlem, Marcus says that each place has its own questions of sustainable practices and faces unique challenges based on the local markets and supply chain.  “We need to activate the farmers markets and hire from within the community in order to create sustainable practices,” says Marcus.  Red Rooster has been doing this since its inception and Marcus can recall the success that it has had in doing so. “Buying from the farmers market and purchasing ingredients that are relevant to the community is something chefs can do to activate the local economy. I see it when we create menu items at Red Rooster based on the availability of ingredients at the market,” Marcus said in response to a question about local practices from Gail Simmons, cookbook author and TV personality.

Other panelists agreed that chefs have a responsibility to link the produce from the market to the restaurant and broadcast that narrative for the larger public. Marcus was speaking at the Green Summit with Amanda Cohen, Fredrik Berselius, Emma Bengtsson and the conversation was facilitated by Gail Simmons.

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LIVE with Kelly & Michael

By Marcus Samuelsson | November 5, 2015

Marcus Samuelsson appears LIVE on Kelly and Michael and makes a "Swediopian" Sweet Potato Mash

I had such a good time appearing on Kelly & Michael in Washington, DC last week. They challenged me to make a dish using the beautiful fall Sweet Potato. I went “Swediopian” with it, adding some Ethiopian Berbere, keeping it chunky, and serving it with Swedish Meatballs and a Raw Kale Salad. This side dish would be a great way to add some flavor to any fall meal. Try it for Thanksgiving for a new take on a classic.

Get the recipe for my Chunky Mashed Sweet Potatoes here!

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Join us at Rooster’s Market!

By Raquel Jacquez | November 3, 2015


Kick-off your holiday shopping uptown at Chef Marcus Samuelsson’s Rooster’s Market. This shopping event will feature some of NYC’s up and coming designers, collectors and artists. Come check off your wish list with us and enjoy complimentary mimosas and a special Rooster market menu you’re sure to love!

We are still looking for more vendors so send us a message if you’re interested in showcasing your work! Please send all inquiries to


Chasing FlavorsChefFood Stories

Parts Unknown: Ethiopia

By Raquel Jacquez | November 2, 2015


Thank you to CNN, Food Republic, and Tadias Magazine for giving me the opportunity to highlight the behind the scenes moments of Anthony Bourdain’s episode of “Parts Unknown” featuring Ethiopia at Ginny’s Supper Club a few weeks ago.

When the episode went live, Maya and I were thrilled at the response from viewers all over the world.  Thank you for your outpour of support and we hope that you enjoyed watching as we traveled throughout Ethiopia from Addis Adaba to Maya’s family’s village.

Here are a few behind-the-scenes pictures from the filming of the episode.

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Ginny’s Supper Club Presents Lea DeLaria

By Jenn Burka | October 28, 2015



We are excited to announce a new Sunday Brunch series at Ginny’s Supper Club featuring jazz performances from acclaimed actress, comedian, Broadway star and jazz singer Lea DeLaria (@realleadelaria)An American comedian and actress most recently recognized for her role as “Big Boo” Black on the Netflix hit series Orange Is the New Black, DeLaria is also an acclaimed jazz musician. She was the first openly gay comic to appear on a late-night talk show with her 1993 appearance on The Arsenio Hall Show. She has appeared in numerous Broadway shows, a number of films including The First Wives Club and Edge Of Seventeen, and has released two comedy albums and five jazz albums.

During the performances, a Rooster Brunch Buffet will include favorites like Mac n’ Greens; Fried Yardbird with Mashed Potatoes; Chicken & Waffles; Deviled Eggs; Helga’s Meatballs and Migas with Truck Stop Potatoes.

Sunday Brunch with Lea DeLaria at Ginny’s Supper Club

November 8 | December 13 | January 10

12:00PM and 1:30PM

Tickets are $45 per person and can be purchased on Ginny’s website.

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From a Chef’s Perspective: Marcus in Conversation with Tom Colicchio and Andrea Reusing at the New York Times’ Food for Tomorrow Conference

By Raquel Jacquez | October 22, 2015

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Screen Shot 2015-10-22 at 3.32.00 PM

This week, chefs, activists, policymakers, farmers and journalists convened for the New York Times’ Food for Tomorrow Conference at the Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture.

In a conversation facilitated by Sam Sifton (New York Times food editor), with Tom Colicchio (Craft Restaurants and Co-Founder of Food Policy Action) and Andrea Reusing (Lantern and The Durham), Marcus discussed the divide between what comes out of urban America and what is in and of urban America, particularly when we think about food as an expression of art, culture and history.

Marcus first began thinking about this because he wanted to find purpose in being a chef in Harlem – a community where there is a huge divide between the pleasures of good food and access to a dining experience that celebrates the community’s art, history and culture. From the beginning, Marcus says, he was thinking about these dynamics when he opened Red Rooster.

As a result of the industrialized and modern food system, the working poor have gained the convenience of cheap food, but it has come with a price. Marcus believes that we have traded the convenience of cheap food for the basic skills of cooking and preparing foods. In other words, we now have an entire generation of people lacking the knowledge and skills needed to prepare food for themselves and are, instead, stuck in a food system that has removed agency by marketing cheap food that is conveniently making us sick. Whether or not this trade-off was an intentional decision we made, is not the point. The point is that we are facing major consequences as a result of the design of our food system and we have to begin to think about how to combat the challenges together, as a community. Tom Colicchio agreed with Marcus and added, “We need to educate a population. We are a generation removed from actually having any skills at all in the kitchen and knowing where food comes from.”

While we need radically different policies in our food system in order to create access to healthy foods for the working poor, there are significant solutions that we can implement in our own neighborhoods to change the way people are thinking about food. “My food memories growing up, aside from my family, come from the lunches that I had at school where I really actually started to develop a real sense of flavor because it was real food – not what we have right now,” says Marcus. Imagine if, as Marcus suggests, the lunchroom actually resembled the complexity of flavors in America’s diverse population and we were serving children real food while simultaneously educating them about how to prepare it.

“The beauty of America,” as Marcus points out, “is that we are so complex and so different. We are one of the few countries in the world that don’t have one food identity. That is the beauty and also the complexity.” By intentionally evoking interest in flavor and ingredients, we could potentially have a fully engaged population who is intrigued by real food and has baseline knowledge about the food system. A generation that can cook will raise the awareness that we need in order to prioritize what is important for the environment, our communities and ourselves.

You can view all of the videos from the New York Times’ Food for Tomorrow Conference here.

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Halloween at Red Rooster and Ginny’s Supper Club

By Jenn Burka | October 19, 2015



Halloween is one of our favorite events over at the Roo and Ginny’s Supper Club, and this year we have events for everyone.

For those with children, join us at “Boo at the Roo,” a fun day of games, prizes, a maze, and of course candy at Red Rooster.

Once the kids are tucked away, the freaks come out to play! At night, we have three fun events, which we hope to see you at. At 7:30pm, we have an extra spooky supper club at Ginny’s. ELEW will be performing live while we show a silent horror film in the background. At 9:30, we will transition Ginny’s into our Freaks Come Out at Night Halloween Party with headliners DJ Evil Dee & Mr. Walt of Da Beatminerz. Both events are $15 and tickets can be bought here. We’ll also be having a costume contest with great prizes.

If you prefer old school hip hop, you can head upstairs to Red Rooster for DJ Kool Herc’s Hip Hop Halloween. Entry is free, and we’ll be there dancing the night away until close.

We hope to see you there!

Boo At the Roo
Red Rooster
October 31st 11am-2pm
Free Admission

Hip Hop Halloween
Red Rooster
October 31st 9:30pm
Free Admission

Halloween Supper Club
Ginny’s Supper Club
October 31st 7:30pm
$15 | Tickets here

Freaks Come Out at Night Halloween Party
Ginny’s Supper Club
October 31st 9:30pm
$15 | Tickets here


EventsGinny's SuperclubTravel

Advanced Screening of Parts Unknown: Ethiopia

By Marcus Samuelsson | October 14, 2015

Parts Unknown Ethiopia

Parts Unknown Ethiopia

I am thrilled at the opportunity that CNN, Food Republic, and Tadias Magazine have given me to highlight the behind the scenes moments of Anthony Bourdain’s episode of “Parts Unknown” featuring Ethiopia on Monday, October 19th at 7pm at Ginny’s Supper Club. The episode we filmed will air on CNN on October 25th, but this advanced screening on Monday will allow you all to join Maya and me in an informal setting as we watch the episode and engage in discussion following.

I’ve been a fan of Parts Unknown since it aired in 2013. I loved having the opportunity to show my good friend Tony around Ethiopia, trying to reveal some of the unknown areas both to him and his many viewers. It was rewarding to realize have far I have come in my explorations of my native country (and how much I still have to discover). My wife Maya and I had a blast bringing Tony to Addis Adaba, which is the capital city of Ethiopa and often considered to be the political capital of all of Africa. We made sure that Tony got to sample a large mix of food, sounds, and sights in this busy metropolis. We also brought Tony to Maya’s family in the Gurage region to experience the somewhat more modest life in an Ethiopian village (although the village feast we were served hardly seems like it could be labeled as “modest”).

I’m looking forward to sharing more about the making of this episode at the event at Ginny’s on Monday. We will also be featuring some specialty cocktails and Ethiopian-focused small plates to bring some of the smells and tastes from the episode to you as well.

I hope to see you there!


Advanced Screening of Parts Unknown: Ethiopia 
Ginny’s Supper Club
October 19th @ 7:00PM
$25 | Tickets here
This event is 21+

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Clinton Global Initiative – Call to Action

By Raquel Jacquez | October 8, 2015


During last month’s Clinton Global Initiative, Marcus joined a panel of experts to discuss the role of food and nutrition in global poverty and specifically, how chefs might be catalysts for change.

Poverty in America, as Marcus puts it, affects people differently than it does in his home country of Ethiopia. In America, we have extreme wealth that disconnects us from our food because cooking with real ingredients is expensive and perceived as inefficient in our busy lives. However, if we take the time to learn how to cook, he argues, everyone in the community will benefit. Further, Marcus challenges the audience to cook and eat based on a spiritual compass – meaning, eat things that relate to your own personal history and values. When we eat foods that are whole and seasonal, reusing ingredients throughout the week in order to avoid wasting food and overspending, we are satisfying our palate as well as our spiritual compass.

The strength in Marcus’ approach is his understanding that in order to be successful, we all need the tools to create lasting change in our own lives. Part of the reason that Marcus opened Red Rooster in Harlem was to not just change the restaurant footprint in the neighborhood, but to also highlight the complexities of poverty and malnutrition that exist in his own community. Watch Marcus discuss these issues in the video below or watch more videos from the 2015 Clinton Global Initiative here.

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Can You Spend Less Money on Food and Improve Global Poverty? I Think So. And Here’s How to Do It.

By Raquel Jacquez | October 6, 2015

Marcus Samuelsson discusses hunger, cooking and obesity in the U.S.

Poverty in America looks very different from poverty in other parts of the world. While being poor in my home nation of Ethiopia means not having access to water but eating incredibly delicious and healthy foods everyday, being poor in the United States can mean clean water but not necessarily nutritious things to eat. Poverty is a problem that affects all parts of the globe, so it can be hard to visualize what you can do here at home to.

As a chef running a busy kitchen, I’ve learned a lot about about saving, planning and projecting and I truly believe that making even a small change to an individual’s daily routine can make an impact on a larger scale. The mentality in American culture is often “the bigger the better,” but we are all smart enough to know that’s not exactly the case. Just like at a restaurant, planning out your meals in advance means you are only buying exactly what you need and not spending in excess. Saving room in the plan for leftovers means wasting less and that planning will become easier as “needs” adjust away from “wants.”

You’ll be saving money, but how does this affect the global idea of poverty? Simple economics tells us that demand is directly related to price. When demand drops because more people are buying only what they need, the price drops making commodities more affordable for everyone, especially those who have smaller budgets and income. While it may seem like a far-fetched solution, a more global consciousness of need versus want could have big implications.

Another way that I, as a chef, have thought about this issue in regard to food has been through education. After the financial crisis of 2008, many Americans were facing financial insecurity, especially in neighborhoods like mine. Unemployment in Harlem was more than twice the national average and in a neighborhood where amenities are already scarce this meant different kinds of sacrifices were made, especially when it came to nutrition. American families in general began spending less of their incomes on food and the category that took the biggest hit: fresh produce. People instead began turning more and more to quick and cheap calories at fast food places, where a few dollars can buy you fries, a burger and a soda. While shopping and cooking does take more time than drive-thru, a commitment to healthy eating can be delicious and cost-effective.

I’ve been doing cooking classes in Harlem since Red Rooster opened in 2010 and it has been an indescribable experience showing kids from the YMCA or a local charter school that vegetables don’t have to be soggy and over-steamed but delicious! They’ve learned about food they’ve never had before that can pack in protein and nutrients and still taste good, including alternative grains like teff, quinoa and couscous. I believe you can eat wonderful meals and feel satisfied after eating less when you infuse rich flavors into your cooking. Simply put, nourishing foods can be budget friendly – and chefs share the responsibility of broadcasting that message!

Let’s not forget that healthy eating leads to a healthier society overall, which means a cheaper cost of living for everyone! Our country is in the midst of a cataclysmic health crisis, much of it caused by how we eat. More than one-third of American adults are currently obese (another one-third are overweight), and according to the CDC, the prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents has almost tripled since 1980. It becomes an even more alarming number when you read that obesity is already causing $150 billion annually in medical costs. Imagine where that money could be spent if we reduced American obesity rates by even half! There would be more funding for programs that helped feed the homeless, educate the underserved and increase the employability of those in poverty through job training.

This article was originally posted as part of LinkedIN’s Take Action series in which Influencers and members discuss how to drive change that matters. Read the original post here.

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Whether it’s finding the best goat tacos in LA, spotting a well-worn vintage bag in Sweden, or interviewing the “crab man” selling seafood on a corner in Harlem, we tell stories seen from Chef Marcus Samuelsson‘s point of view. strives to create conversations about food, nutrition, culture, art, and design. We want to find Read More


Streetbird Rotisserie
Marcus’ Bermuda
Eatery Social Taqueria
Red Rooster Harlem
Ginny’s Supper Club
Uptown Brasserie
American Table Cafe and Bar
Kitchen and Table
American Table Brasserie and Bar
Marc Burger