Dinner

By Joanne Bruno | April 8, 2013

Fettuccine Asparagus

After a winter filled with every variation on grey and beige, I’m ready to infuse my life and my food with a little color.

Dinner made out of fifty shades of green? Yes, please.

Asparagus season is finally upon us and I’m ready to take full advantage of it. Here, I’ve turned these lovely spears into a vibrantly flavored, pesto-like puree which I then used as a pasta sauce for some spinach fettuccine.

Fettuccine Asparague

Two delicious shades down, forty-eight to go.

Fettuccine Asparague

Joanne Bruno is a food writer and fourth year MD/PhD student. Fine more delicious ramblings over at her blog: Eats Well with Others

Adapted from Super Natural Cooking

Fettuccine Tangle with Spring Asparagus Puree Recipe

Servings: 4-6

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch asparagus spears, trimmed and halved crosswise
  • 3 handfuls baby spinach leaves
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese
  • 1 cup toasted pine nuts
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/2 tsp fine-grain sea salt
  • 12 oz fresh spinach fettuccine (or 8 oz dried)

Directions

1. Bring two pots of salted water to a boil. Use the larger one to cook the pasta and the smaller one to blanch the asparagus.

2. To make the asparagus puree, drop the asparagus spears into the pot of salted water. Cook for 2-3 minutes or until the spears are bright green. Drain and transfer to a food processor.

3. Add the spinach, garlic, parmesan cheese, and 3/4 cup of the pine nuts to the processor. Puree. With the motor still on, drizzle in the 1/4 cup olive oil until a paste forms. It
should be about the consistency of a pesto. Add in the lemon juice and salt, to taste.

4. Cook the pasta until al dente. Drain and toss with the asparagus puree. Sprinkle with the remaining pine nuts.

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